Hate crime

Violence and offences motivated by racism, xenophobia, religious intolerance, or by bias against a person’s disability, sexual orientation or gender identity are all examples of hate crime.

These crimes can affect anyone in society. But whoever the victim is, such offences harm not only the individual targeted but also strike at the heart of EU commitments to democracy and the fundamental rights of equality and non-discrimination. 

To combat hate crime, the EU and its Member States need to make these crimes more visible and hold perpetrators to account. Numerous rulings by the European Court of Human Rights oblige countries to ‘unmask’ the bias motivation behind criminal offences.

Efforts to form targeted policies for combating hate crime are hampered by under-recording, ie the fact that few EU Member States collect comprehensive data on such offences. In addition, a lack of trust in the law enforcement and criminal justice systems means that the majority of hate crime victims do not report their experiences, leading to under-reporting. FRA’s work documents both of these gaps in data collection, as well as the extent of prejudice against groups such as Roma, LGBT, Muslims, and migrant communities. At the same time, it makes recommendations on how the situation could be improved.

Article 1 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights guarantees the right to human dignity, while Article 10 stipulates the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. Article 21 prohibits discrimination based on any ground, including sex, ethnic origin, religion, sexual orientation or disability.

Latest news View all

14/07/2016

Roundtable event looks at combating LGBTI hate crime

FRA provided input from its Compendium of good practices for tackling Hate Crime to a roundtable event on 1 July in Budapest on combating LGBTI hate cime. The event was organised by the UNI-FORM project that gathers participants from 10 EU Member States (Portugal, Spain, UK, Ireland, Malta, Belgium, Hungary, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania).
14/07/2016

Training on tackling hate crime for law enforcement officers

FRA provided training on how to combat hate crime to 47 law enforcement officers in the framework of a European Police College training course from 4 to 5 July in Zagreb. The overall aim was to provide law enforcement officials with up-to-date information in identifying hate crime, including hate speech, and in taking appropriate actions to investigate these crimes.
14/07/2016

Training in Romania looks at antisemitism, discrimination and xenophobia

FRA addressed about 100 representatives of the Romanian police forces from 5 to 6 July during a capacity building workshop for Romanian police officers on how to implement the specific legislation on hate crime, Holocaust denial, antisemitism and other manifestations of xenophobia, discrimination or racism.

Latest projects View all

Latest publications View all

May
2016

Fundamental Rights Report 2016

Annual report
The European Union (EU) and its Member States introduced and pursued numerous initiatives to safeguard and strengthen fundamental rights in 2015. Some of these efforts produced important progress; others fell short of their aims. Meanwhile, various global developments brought new – and exacerbated existing – challenges.
May
2016

Fundamental Rights Report 2016 - FRA opinions

Annual report
The European Union (EU) and its Member States introduced and pursued numerous initiatives to safeguard and strengthen fundamental rights in 2015. FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2016 summarises and analyses major developments in the fundamental rights field, noting both progress made and persisting obstacles. This publication presents FRA’s opinions on the main developments in the thematic areas covered and a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. In so doing, it provides a compact but informative overview of the main fundamental rights challenges confronting the EU and its Member States.
April
2016

Ensuring justice for hate crime victims: professional perspectives

Report
Hate crime is the most severe expression of discrimination, and a core fundamental rights abuse. Various initiatives target such crime, but most hate crime across the EU remains unreported and unprosecuted, leaving victims without redress. To counter this trend, it is essential for Member States to improve access to justice for victims. Drawing on interviews with representatives from criminal courts, public prosecutors’ offices, the police, and NGOs involved in supporting hate crime victims, this report sheds light on the diverse hurdles that impede victims’ access to justice and the proper recording of hate crime.