Country

Netherlands Netherlands

Title

Smeekes, A., Verkuyten, M., & Poppe, E. (2012), 'How a tolerant past affects the present: Historical tolerance and the acceptance of Muslim expressive rights', Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (38) 11, 1410-1422.

View full Research

Year

2012

Type of publication

Study - qualitative research

Geographical coverage

National

Area/location of interest

Not applicable - national level

Type of Institution

Academic

Institution

Smeekes, A., Verkuyten, M., & Poppe, E.

Main Thematic Focus

Public perceptions & attitudes Discrimination

Target Population

General population

Key findings

This paper reports on 3 studies, conducted among native Dutch, examines the relationship between a tolerant representation of national history and the acceptance of Muslim expressive rights. Following self-categorization theory, it was hypothesized that historical tolerance would be associated with greater acceptance of Muslim expressive rights, especially for natives who strongly identify with their national in-group. Furthermore, it was predicted that the positive effect of representations of historical tolerance on higher identifiers’ acceptance could be explained by reduced perceptions of identity incompatibility. The results of Study 1 confirmed the first hypothesis, and the results of Study 2 and Study 3 supported the second hypothesis.

Methodology (Qualitative/Quantitative and exact type used, questionnaires etc)

This paper reports on three studies. The first study was conducted among 300 native Dutch social science students of the University of Utrecht. Study 2 was conducted among 172 native Dutch students at secondary and higher education. Study 3 was conducted among 97 participant native Dutch students of the University of Utrecht.

Sample details and representativeness

Three studies using three different samples: - 300 native Dutch students of the University of Utrecht - 170 native young Dutch - 97 native Dutch students of the University of Utrecht

DISCLAIMERThe information presented here is collected under contract by the FRA's research network FRANET. The information and views contained do not necessarily reflect the views or the official position of the FRA.