Publications View all

Current migration situation in the EU: Community policing
June
2017

Current migration situation in the EU: Community policing

Paper
This report outlines examples of community policing measures in select EU Member State regions and localities with recently arrived asylum seekers and migrants. It focuses on four main issues: 1) community policing, 2) related police training, 3) community involvement (for example: consultations; giving voice to the concerns of local communities; police involvement in local responses to concerns), and 4) crime prevention activities.
European legal and policy framework on immigration detention of children
June
2017

European legal and policy framework on immigration detention of children

Report
Up to one third of migrants arriving in the European Union since the summer of 2015 have been children. The current emphasis on speedier asylum processing and making returns more effective may trigger increased use of immigration detention, possibly also affecting children. The detention of children implicates various fundamental rights and will only be in line with EU law if limited to exceptional cases. This report aims to support practitioners in implementing relevant polices in line with applicable law by outlining available safeguards against unlawful and arbitrary detention and highlighting promising practices.
Annual activity report 2016
June
2017

Annual activity report 2016

Annual report
This Consolidated Annual Activity Report (CAAR) provides an overview of the activities and achievements of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) in 2016.
Fundamental Rights Report 2017
May
2017

Fundamental Rights Report 2017

Annual report
Diverse efforts at both EU and national levels sought to bolster fundamental rights protection in 2016, while some measures threatened to undermine such protection.
Fundamental Rights Report 2017 - FRA opinions
May
2017

Fundamental Rights Report 2017 - FRA opinions

Annual report
Diverse efforts at both EU and national levels sought to bolster fundamental rights protection in 2016, while some measures threatened to undermine such protection.
Current migration situation in the EU: Education
May
2017

Current migration situation in the EU: Education

Paper
This report assesses asylum seekers’ and refugees’ opportunities to access early childhood education and primary, secondary and tertiary education and training. It identifies measures available for their support, as well as possible areas for improvement.
Ensuring justice for hate crime victims: professional perspectives - Summary
April
2017

Ensuring justice for hate crime victims: professional perspectives - Summary

Report summary
Hate crime is the most severe expression of discrimination and a core fundamental rights abuse. The European Union (EU) has demonstrated its resolve to tackle hate crime with legislation such as the 2008 Framework Decision on combating certain forms and expressions of racism and xenophobia by means of criminal law. Nonetheless, the majority of hate crimes perpetrated in the EU remain unreported and therefore invisible, leaving victims without redress.

Tools

EU Charter appEU Charter App
A fundamental rights
one-stop-shop
for mobile devices

Toolkit for joining up fundamental rightsJoining up fundamental rights
Toolkit for local
regional and national
public officials

Survey data explorerSurvey results data explorer

 

Toolkit for joining up fundamental rightsClarity
Interactive tool allows you to find
the right organisation to help you with your fundamental rights problem

Opinions View all

FRA Opinion on fundamental rights in the 'hotspots' set up in Greece and Italy
29/11/2016

FRA Opinion on fundamental rights in the 'hotspots' set up in Greece and Italy

Without being exhaustive, this opinion discusses selected topics which touch certain Charter rights, identifying the challenges and describing measures that could be taken to mitigate the risk of actions, which are not compliant with the Charter. It does not focus exclusively on risks arising in direct relation to the involvement of EU actors on the ground, but also takes into account that the hotspot approach entails a certain share of responsibility of the EU for the situation in the hotspots overall.