Highlights

  • Report / Paper / Summary
    8
    Dezember
    2022
    Artificial intelligence is everywhere and affects everyone – from deciding what content people see on their social media feeds to determining who will receive state benefits. AI technologies are typically based on algorithms that make predictions to support or even fully automate decision-making.
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    18
    Juni
    2020
    This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
  • Handbook / Guide / Manual
    25
    Mai
    2018
    Die rasante Entwicklung der Informationstechnologie hat den Bedarf nach einem stabilen
    Schutz personenbezogener Daten verschärft, das Recht darauf wird sowohl durch Instrumente
    der Europäischen Union (EU) als auch des Europarates geschützt. Der Schutz dieses wichtigen
    Rechts steht vor neuen und großen Herausforderungen, da technologische Fortschritte die
    Möglichkeiten beispielsweise bei der Überwachung, beim Abfangen von Kommunikation und
    bei der Datenspeicherung erweitern. Dieses Handbuch bietet für Angehörige der Rechtsberufe,
    die sich im Bereich des Datenschutzes nicht so gut auskennen, eine Einführung in diesen
    aufstrebenden Rechtsbereich.
  • Video
    This video blog by FRA Director Michael O'Flaherty is released periodically and will address burning fundamental rights themes.
Produkte
Artificial intelligence is here. It’s not going away. It can be a force for good, but it needs to be watched so carefully in terms of respect for our human fundamental rights. The EU Fundamental Rights Agency is deeply committed to this work.Our ambition is not just to ensure that AI respects our rights, but also that it protects and promotes them.
Will AI revolutionise the delivery of our public services? And what's the right balance? How is the private sector using AI to automate decisions — and what implications
might that have? Are some form of binding rules necessary to monitor and regulate the use of AI technology - and what should these rules look like?
How do we embrace progress while protecting our fundamental rights? As data-driven decision making increasingly touches our daily lives, what does this mean
for our fundamental rights? A step into the dark? Or the next giant leap? The time to answer these questions is here and now. Let’s seize the opportunities, but understand the challenges. Let’s make AI work for everyone in Europe…And get the future right.
14
Dezember
2020
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets, where a burglary is likely to take place, whether someone is at risk of cancer, or who sees that catchy advertisement for low mortgage rates. Its use keeps growing, presenting seemingly endless possibilities. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. This report presents concrete examples of how companies and public administrations in the EU are using, or trying to use, AI. It focuses on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
Juli
2020
As we enter the second half of 2020, the constraints on our daily lives brought about by the Coronavirus pandemic have become a firm reality. New local lockdowns and the reintroduction of restrictive measures prompted by fresh outbreaks of the virus are a stark reminder that COVID-19 continues to shape our lives – and our enjoyment of fundamental rights – in profound ways. There is compelling evidence of how the pandemic has exacerbated existing challenges in our societies. This FRA Bulletin outlines some of the measures EU Member States adopted to safely reopen their societies and economies while continuing to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. It highlights the impact these measures may have on civil, political and socioeconomic rights.
22
Juli
2020
This paper presents people’s concerns and experiences relating to security. It covers worry about crime, including terrorism and online fraud; experience of online fraud; experience of cyberharassment; and concern about illegal access to data.
What are the next steps in the digitalisation of justice and of access to justice? This impulse video statement by FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty was recorded for the online conference “Access to Justice in the Digital Age”. The conference takes place on 16 July and is organised by the German Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer Protection during the German Council Presidency.
18
Juni
2020
This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
11
Juni
2020
Das Jahr 2019 brachte beim Schutz der Grundrechte sowohl Fortschritte als auch Rückschritte. In ihrem Grundrechte-Bericht 2020 untersucht die FRA wichtige Entwicklungen auf diesem Gebiet und zeigt sowohl Erfolge auf als auch Bereiche, in denen es immer noch Probleme gibt. Darüber hinaus formuliert die FRA in dieser Veröffentlichung ihre Stellungnahmen zu den wichtigsten Entwicklungen in den abgedeckten Themenbereichen und gibt einen Überblick über die Informationen, die diesen Stellungnahmen zugrunde liegen. So bietet diese Veröffentlichung einen knappen, aber informativen Überblick über die größten Herausforderungen, mit denen die EU und ihre Mitgliedstaaten im Bereich der Grundrechte konfrontiert sind.
11
Juni
2020
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2020 reviews major developments in the field in 2019, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores how to unlock the full potential of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
28
Mai
2020
The Coronavirus pandemic continues to interrupt everyday life in the EU in unprecedented ways. But the way it affects our societies is shifting. As governments gradually lift some of the measures put in place to contain the spread of COVID-19, new fundamental rights concerns arise: how to ensure that the rights to life and health are upheld as daily life transitions to a ‘new normal’. This Bulletin looks at declarations of states of emergency, or equivalent, and how they came under scrutiny. It considers the impact on fundamental rights in important areas of daily life, and includes a thematic focus on the processing of users’ data to help contain COVID-19, particularly by contact-tracing apps. It covers the period 21 March – 30 April 2020.
In this vlog Michael O'Flaherty outlines fundamental rights considerations when developing technological responses to public health, as he introduces the focus of FRA's next COVID-19 bulletin.
8
April
2020
The outbreak of COVID-19 affects people’s daily life in the 27 EU Member States. As the number of infected people in the EU territory began to mount rapidly in February and March, governments put in place a raft of measures – often introduced in a period of only a few days – in an effort to contain the spread of the virus. Many of these measures reflect how, in exceptional emergency situations, the urgent need to save lives justifies restrictions on other rights, such as the freedom of movement and of assembly. This report outlines some of the measures EU Member States have put in place to protect public health during the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers the period 1 February – 20 March 2020.
Michael O'Flaherty talks in his vlog about the human rights aspects in the context of the Coronavirus epidemic and introduces FRA's new report.
In the latest edition of his video blog, FRA Director Michael O'Flaherty speaks about the importance and power of hope accompanying the work of FRA in 2020. Particularly after a troubled start of the year.
In the latest edition of his video blog, FRA Director Michael O'Flaherty speaks about the human rights challenges, but also the opportunities, that come along with the development of artificial intelligence technology.
27
November
2019
Mithilfe von Gesichtserkennungstechnologie können digitale Gesichtsbilder verglichen werden, um festzustellen, ob sie dieselbe Person zeigen. Der Vergleich von Aufnahmen von Videokameras mit Bildern in Datenbanken wird als Live-Gesichtserkennungstechnologie bezeichnet. Nur wenige nationale Strafverfolgungsbehörden in der EU nutzen derzeit eine solche Technologie – doch mehrere erproben ihr Potenzial. Im vorliegenden Fokuspapier werden daher die Auswirkungen der Live-Gesichtserkennungstechnologie im Hinblick auf die Grundrechte untersucht, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf der Nutzung für die Zwecke der Strafverfolgung und des Grenzmanagements liegt.
As part of the background research for the Agency’s project on ‘Artificial intelligence (AI), Big Data and Fundamental Rights’, FRA has collected information on AI-related policy initiatives in EU Member States and beyond in the period 2016-2020. The collection currently includes about 350 initiatives.
Fundamental Rights Report 2019: 2018 was a landmark year for data protection. New EU rules took effect and complaints of breaches increased significantly.
12
Juni
2019
The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has applied across the European Union (EU) since 25 May 2018. One year on, this paper looks at how the new regulation has affected the daily work of civil society organisations (CSOs).
Nach neuen Vorschlägen für das Visa-Informationssystem (VIS) der EU könnten sensible personenbezogene Daten von langfristig Aufenthaltsberechtigten auf unbestimmte Zeit gespeichert werden. Dem jüngsten Gutachten der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) zufolge ist dies mit Risiken für die Privatsphäre und den Datenschutz verbunden.
Beinahe 60 % der Europäerinnen und Europäer finden, dass es bei der Arbeitssuche von Nachteil ist, alt zu sein. Die Gesellschaft sieht ältere Menschen häufig als Belastung an. Zu oft übersehen wir die grundlegenden Menschenrechte unserer älteren Mitmenschen. In ihrem Grundrechtebericht 2018 untersucht die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA), wie ein rechtebezogener Ansatz hin zu Achtung älteren Menschen gegenüber fußzufassen beginnt.
Das neue Themenpapier der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) befasst sich mit dem Diskriminierungspotenzial, das die Nutzung großer Datenmengen (Big Data) für die automatisierte Entscheidungsfindung birgt. Zusätzlich zeigt das Papier auch mögliche Wege zur Minimierung dieses Risikos auf.
Die Europäische Union und der Europarat haben ihre Rechtsrahmen zum Schutz personenbezogener Daten überarbeitet, um mit den Veränderungen in diesem äußerst dynamischen Bereich Schritt zu halten. Die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA), der Europarat und der Europäische Datenschutzbeauftragte haben kürzlich eine aktualisierte Fassung des populären Praxishandbuchs zum europäischen Datenschutzrecht herausgegeben, da in der EU nunmehr neue Datenschutzvorschriften gelten und der geänderte Wortlaut des Übereinkommens zum Schutz des Menschen bei der automatischen Verarbeitung personenbezogener Daten jüngst verabschiedet wurde.
IT-Systeme können hilfreich sein, etwa wenn es darum geht, vermisste Migrantenkinder wiederzufinden oder Identitätsdiebstahl zu bekämpfen. Doch sie bergen auch erhebliche Risiken für die Grundrechte von Menschen, wie zum Beispiel eine ungerechte Behandlung im Rahmen des Asylverfahrens. Dies stellt die Europäische Agentur für Grundrechte (FRA) in einem neuen Bericht fest. Da Behörden zunehmend IT-Systeme nutzen, zeigt der Bericht Wege auf, wie die Rechte der betroffenen Menschen besser geschützt werden können.
Die digitale Revolution ist in vollem Gange, und dies bekommen wir auch in unserem Alltag zunehmend zu spüren. Neue Technologien ändern die Art und Weise, wie unsere personenbezogenen Daten erhoben und verarbeitet werden. Der Europäische Datenschutztag am 28. Januar ist daher ein willkommener Anlass, um uns daran zu erinnern, dass in Zeiten eines rasanten digitalen Wandels ein wirksamer Schutz personenbezogener Daten immer wichtiger wird.
Die FRA veranstaltet dieses Jahr erneut ihr richtungsweisendes Grundrechteforum. Nach dem Erfolg der Veranstaltung im Jahr 2016 werden abermals unterschiedliche Personengruppen aus vielen Lebensbereichen zusammenkommen, um diesmal über die Bedeutung von Zugehörigkeit für verschiedene Gruppen zu diskutieren. Die Teilnehmenden werden versuchen, die besten Wege für den EU-weiten Aufbau einer Grundrechtekultur zu erkunden. Es soll aufgezeigt werden, dass die Grundrechte für alle gelten und von allen geachtet werden müssen.
2017 feierte die FRA ihr zehnjähriges Bestehen – in einer Zeit, in der das Thema Grundrechte wichtiger ist denn je. Das Jubiläum bot die Gelegenheit einer Bestandsaufnahme: Was wurde bisher erreicht, und was muss noch getan werden, damit die Grundrechte wieder als Grundwert in Europa geachtet werden?.
Rechtsreformen machen die Überwachung zwar transparenter, als Gegengewicht zu den Befugnissen der Nachrichtendienste ist aber dennoch eine bessere gegenseitige Kontrolle erforderlich. Zu diesem Schluss kommt die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) in einem neuen Bericht, der zeigt, dass klare Rechtsrahmen, solide Schutzmaßnahmen und wirksame Aufsicht nötig sind, um Sicherheit und die Achtung der Grundrechte zu gewährleisten.
In den vergangenen zehn Jahren wurden neue Rechtsvorschriften und Strategien für die Grundrechte verabschiedet und spezialisierte Einrichtungen geschaffen. Trotzdem bleiben grundrechtliche Herausforderungen bestehen und Rechte werden angegriffen. Dies ist Beleg für eine fehlende Grundrechtekultur quer durch Institutionen und Gesellschaften, wie die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) in ihrem Grundrechtebericht 2017 aufzeigt.
Auf dem Grundrechte-Forum in Wien wurden Vorschläge zur Bewältigung der akuten Menschenrechtskrise in Europa zusammengetragen. Mehr als 700 führende Expertinnen und Experten aus der ganzen Welt wirkten an dem Ereignis der EU-Agentur für Grundrechte mit. Alle praktischen Ideen - über 100 an der Zahl -, die hier entstanden sind, wird die Erklärung des Vorsitzenden des Forums zusammenfassen.
Mehr als eine Million Menschen suchten im Jahr 2015 Zuflucht in der EU – fünfmal mehr als im Vorjahr. In ihrem Grundrechte-Bericht 2016 untersucht die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) den Umfang und die Art dieser Herausforderung und nennt Maßnahmen, die die Achtung der Grundrechte innerhalb der EU gewährleisten sollen.
Die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) veröffentlicht heute ihren Bericht zu den geltenden gesetzlichen Regelungen in den EU-Mitgliedstaaten für Nachrichtendienste und ihren Überwachungsverfahren. Der Bericht hebt die Herausforderungen hervor, die sich aus dem Schutz der Bürger bei gleichzeitiger Wahrung der Grundrechte, die den europäischen Gesellschaften zugrunde liegen, ergeben.
2014 starben so viele MigrantInnen wie nie beim Versuch, das Mittelmeer zu überqueren, um nach Europa zu gelangen. Die EU-Mitgliedstaaten sollten daher erwägen, als Alternative zur riskanten unerlaubten Einreise legale Einreisemöglichkeiten für Menschen zu schaffen, die internationalen Schutz benötigen. Dies ist eine der Schlussfolgerungen des diesjährigen Jahresberichts der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA), der aufzeigt, wie sich zahlreiche Bereiche in der EU im Jahr 2014 entwickelten.
Im Rahmen der Debatte der EU-Minister zur künftigen EU-Politik im Bereich Freiheit, Sicherheit und Recht präsentiert die EU-Agentur für Grundrechte (FRA) den Jahresbericht 2013. Neben praktischen Vorschlägen, wie die Grundrechte der Menschen in der EU besser geschützt werden können, zeigt der FRA-Jahresbericht vor allem auf, welche grundrechtlichen Herausforderungen und Erfolge es im Jahr 2013 gab.
Durch die verbreitete Nutzung von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien von öffentlichen sowie privaten Stellen fallen Menschen in der EU immer wieder Datenschutzverletzungen zum Opfer. Ein Großteil dieser Verletzungen entfällt auf Aktivitäten im Internet, Direktmarketing und Videoüberwachung.