Portugal / Constitutional Court / 242/2018 Public Prosecutor’s Office

Key facts of the case:

 

Article 7 (3) of Law 34/2004 of 29 July (law governing access to the law and to the courts), as amended by Law 47/2007, of 28 August, excluded immediately and categorically the possibility of granting legal aid to legal persons operating for profit. The refusal of legal protection to such entities without taking their concrete economic situation into consideration could possibly violate the constitutional right of access to the law and to effective jurisdictional protection, according to which justice cannot be denied due to a lack of economic resources. 

Key legal question raised by the Court:

The Constitutional Court should decide if article 7 (3) of Law 34/2004 of 29 July was in accordance with article 20 (1) of the Portuguese Constitution (access to law and effective judicial protection). This constitutional norm establishes that everyone is guaranteed access to the law and the courts in order to defend those of his/her rights and interests that are protected by law, and also establishes that justice may not be denied to anyone due to lack of sufficient financial means.

Outcome of the case:

The Constitutional Court decided that article 7 (3) of Law 34/2004 of 29 July, as amended by Law 47/2007, of 28 August, violated article 20 (1) of the Portuguese Constitution, because it excluded automatically the possibility of granting legal aid to legal persons operating for profit. So, the Constitutional Court declared the unconstitutionality, with generally binding force, of this norm.

The Court considered that neither the norms of the European Convention on Human Rights, nor the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights, lead to a solution that requires the exclusion of the possibility of granting legal aid to for-profit legal persons without a concrete evaluation of their situation.

 

The Court also invoked the case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union that underlined that the principle of effective jurisdictional protection set down in the Charter leads to the conclusion that the possibility that legal persons can invoke the principle of effective jurisdictional protection enshrined in the Charter cannot be excluded. This understanding precludes the idea of a necessary incompatibility between the legal aid to legal persons operating for profit and the proper functioning of competitive markets. So, the Constitutional Court considered that this understanding must be applied in the national legal framework bearing in mind a systemic vision of the subject and also to avoid contradictory decisions of the Portuguese courts.    

 

Paragraphs referring to EU Charter: 

The most recent case-law (591/2016, 86/2017, 266/2017) invokes the interpretation of the European Court of Justice of the third paragraph of article 47 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union - used in its judgment of 22 December 2010, DEB Deutsche Energiehandels und Beratungsgesellschaft mbH c. Federal Republic of Germany, Case C-279/09 (accessible from http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=en&num=C-279/09) -, in the sense that this norm does not exclude  the possibility of granting legal aid to for-profit legal persons.

Although the Constitution constitutes the decision parameter for the Constitutional Court (see article 277, paragraph 1), the Court should consider, in order of a systemic view of the legal system applicable in Portugal and its importance for the interpretation of precepts relating to fundamental rights, the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights in relation to Article 6 (1) of the European Convention on Human Rights, as well the interpretation of the Court of Justice in the DEB case, concerning article 47 of the Charter.

The same should apply to articles 52 (3) and 53 (Protection level) of the Charter:

[52(3)] In so far as this Charter contains rights which correspond to rights guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the meaning and scope of those rights shall be the same as those laid down by the said Convention. This provision shall not prevent Union law providing more extensive protection.

[53] Nothing in this Charter shall be interpreted as restricting or adversely affecting human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognised, in their respective fields of application, by Union law and international law and by international agreements to which the Union or all the Member States are party, including the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, and by the Member States' constitutions.

The right to effective judicial protection guaranteed by article 47 of the Charter may require, depending on the circumstances of the specific case, the granting of legal aid to for-profit legal persons, without this being considered as dysfunctional competition rules in an efficient market.

This is why, in its judgment 591/2016,  the Constitutional Court used European Union law and the interpretation of the European Court of Justice in the light of the Charter, given the importance of competition in Union's legal order.

According to article 47, 3§ of the Charter (Right to an effective remedy and to a fair trial), legal aid shall be made available to those who lack sufficient resources in so far as such aid is necessary to ensure effective access to justice. In the judgment of 22 December 2010, DEB Deutsche Energiehandels und Beratungsgesellschaft mbH c. Federal Republic of Germany, Case C-279/09, cited above, the Court was confronted with the following question: whether the interpretation of the principle of effective judicial protection, as enshrined in article 47 of the Charter, precludes national legislation to subject the access to court to the payment of the legal expenses, and does not recognise legal aid to a legal person that cannot pay for such expenses.

In its analysis, the Court also emphasises: (i) that the fact that entitlement to legal aid is not enshrined in Title IV of the Charter relating to solidarity shows that that right was not primarily conceived as social support; (ii) that the integration of the provision on the granting of legal aid in the Charter article on the right to effective action, indicates that the assessment of the need to grant such support must take, as a starting point, the right of the person whose rights and freedoms have been infringed, and not the general interest of society, although this may be one of the factors for assessing the need for support; (iii) that there is, in the law of the Member States and in the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights relating to fair trial (Article 6 (1)), a difference in treatment, based on objective reasons, between commercial companies and natural persons and non-profit legal persons. In any case, its conclusion regarding article 47 of the Charter is as follows: the principle of effective judicial protection, as enshrined in Article 47 of the Charter, must be interpreted as meaning that it is not excluded that it may be invoked by legal persons, and that the support granted in application of that principle may cover, in particular, waiver of court fees and/or the assistance of a lawyer.

Hence the meaning of the Court's statement given in response to the question referred for a preliminary ruling: the principle of effective judicial protection, as enshrined in Article 47 of the Charter, must be interpreted as meaning that it is not excluded that it may be invoked by legal persons, and that the support granted in application of that principle may cover, in particular, waiver of court fees and/or the assistance of a lawyer.

This understanding of the principle of effective judicial protection enshrined in Article 47 of the CDFUE removes the idea of a necessary incompatibility between legal aid provided to legal persons operating for profit, and the proper functioning of competitive markets, as is the case of the EU internal market.

The absolute impossibility of a for-profit legal person to discuss with the competent Portuguese authorities its economic insufficiency in order to obtain the legal aid necessary for its effective judicial protection - this is the meaning of the norm establishe in article 7 (3) of Law 34/2004 – is contrary to article 6 (1) of the ECHR and to the third paragraph of article 47 of the Charter.

It is in this context, and bearing in mind that the fundamental right to effective judicial protection is the same in the context of European Union law and in the Portuguese constitutional framework, that it is justified to seek solutions from the national legislator in systemic terms. In such a perspective, the norm of Article 7 (3) of the Law 34/2004 can lead to solutions that are clearly contrary to the unit of values concerning fundamental rights applicable by the Portuguese courts.

We may consider the hypothesis of a commercial company, Portuguese or national of another Member State of the European Union, in economic difficulties due to the violation of rules of European Union law by the Portuguese State and that intends to effect civil liability of the latter: the absolute impossibility of discussing with the competent Portuguese authorities its economic insufficiency in order to obtain the necessary legal protection to ensure effective judicial protection, is contrary to the third paragraph of article 47 of the Charter, and places it in a situation of unequality vis-à-vis other companies in other Member States. On the other hand, the solution established in article 20 (1) of the Constitution appears to be in line with the idea of access to justice, as understood in the context of European Union law.

Paragraphs referring to EU Charter (original language): 

(…) a jurisprudência mais recente (Acórdãos n.ºs 591/2016, 86/2017, 266/2017) convoca a interpretação que o Tribunal de Justiça fez do artigo 47.º, terceiro parágrafo, da Carta dos Direitos Fundamentais da União Europeia (“CDFUE”) no seu Acórdão de 22 de dezembro de 2010, DEB Deutsche Energiehandels- und Beratungsgesellschaft mbH c. República Federal da Alemanha, Processo C-279/09 (acessível a partir de http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=en&num=C-279/09) – no sentido de que tal norma se opõe à exclusão em termos gerais e abstratos do acesso de uma dada categoria de sujeitos de direito, como as pessoas coletivas com fins lucrativos, ao apoio judiciário (…).

(…) sem prejuízo de o parâmetro de um eventual juízo de inconstitucionalidade a emitir pelo Tribunal Constitucional no presente caso ser necessariamente a Constituição (cfr. o seu artigo 277.º, n.º 1), deverá considerar-se, em atenção a uma visão sistémica do ordenamento jurídico aplicável em Portugal e à respetiva importância para a interpretação de preceitos relativos a direitos fundamentais, a jurisprudência do Tribunal Europeu dos Direitos do Homem (“TEDH”) quanto ao artigo 6.º, § 1, primeira frase da Convenção Europeia dos Direitos do Homem (“CEDH”) e, bem assim, à jurisprudência do Tribunal de Justiça no caso DEB, a propósito do artigo 47.º da CDFUE.

E o mesmo deverá suceder relativamente aos artigos 52.º, n.º 3, e 53.º (Nível de proteção) da Carta:

  «[52.º-3] Na medida em que a presente Carta contenha direitos correspondentes aos direitos garantidos pela [CEDH], o sentido e o âmbito desses direitos são iguais aos conferidos por essa Convenção. Esta disposição não obsta a que o direito da União confira uma proteção mais ampla»

«[53.º] Nenhuma disposição da presente Carta deve ser interpretada no sentido de restringir ou lesar os direitos do Homem e as liberdades fundamentais reconhecidos, nos respetivos âmbitos de aplicação, pelo direito da União, o direito internacional e as Convenções internacionais em que são Partes a União ou todos os Estados-Membros, nomeadamente a [CEDH], bem como pelas Constituições dos Estados-Membros.

 (…) o direito a uma proteção jurisdicional efetiva garantido pelo artigo 47.º da CDFUE pode exigir, dependendo das circunstâncias do caso concreto, justamente, a concessão de apoio judiciário a pessoas coletivas com fins lucrativos, sem que tal possa ser considerado como disfuncional relativamente às regras da concorrência num mercado eficiente. 

(…) Foi a este propósito que no Acórdão n.º 591/2016 se chamou à colação o direito da União Europeia e a sua interpretação pelo Tribunal de Justiça à luz da CDFUE, atenta a centralidade da concorrência no ordenamento da União.

(…) O artigo 47.º da CDFUE, sob a epígrafe «Direito à ação e a um tribunal imparcial», dispõe no seu terceiro parágrafo: «[é] concedida assistência judiciária a quem não disponha de recursos suficientes, na medida em que essa assistência seja necessária para garantir a efetividade do acesso à justiça». No Acórdão de 22 de dezembro de 2010, DEB Deutsche Energiehandels- und Beratungsgesellschaft mbH c. República Federal da Alemanha, Processo C-279/09, já mencionado, o Tribunal de Justiça foi confrontado com a seguinte questão prejudicial (já reformulada pelo próprio Tribunal): «[Saber se a] interpretação do princípio da proteção jurisdicional efetiva, como consagrado no artigo 47.° da Carta, com vista a verificar se, no contexto de uma ação de indemnização intentada contra o Estado ao abrigo do direito da União, essa disposição se opõe a que uma legislação nacional sujeite o exercício da ação judicial ao pagamento de um preparo e preveja que não deve ser concedido apoio judiciário a uma pessoa coletiva, numa situação em que esta última não tem a possibilidade de pagar esse preparo».

Na sua análise, o Tribunal de Justiça sublinha, além do mais: (i) que «o facto de o direito de beneficiar de apoio judiciário não estar consagrado no Título IV da Carta, relativo à solidariedade, revela que esse direito não foi principalmente concebido como um apoio social […]» (§ 41); (ii) que, «[d]o mesmo modo, a integração da disposição relativa à concessão de apoio judiciário no artigo da Carta relativo ao direito a uma ação efetiva indica que a apreciação da necessidade da concessão desse apoio deve ser feita tomando como ponto de partida o direito da própria pessoa cujos direitos e liberdades garantidos pelo direito da União foram violados e não o interesse geral da sociedade, embora este possa ser um dos elementos de apreciação da necessidade do apoio» (§ 42; itálicos aditados); e (iii) que existe no direito dos Estados-Membros e na jurisprudência do Tribunal Europeu dos Direitos do Homem relativa ao processo equitativo (artigo 6.º, n.º 1) uma diferença de tratamento assente em razões objetivas e razoáveis entre as sociedades comerciais, por um lado, e pessoas singulares e as pessoas coletivas sem fins lucrativos, por outro (§§ 44-52). De todo o modo, a sua conclusão relativamente ao artigo 47.º da CDFUE é a seguinte (§ 59): «[O] princípio da proteção jurisdicional efetiva, como consagrado no artigo 47.º da Carta, deve ser interpretado no sentido de que não está excluído que possa ser invocado por pessoas coletivas e que o apoio concedido em aplicação deste princípio pode abranger, designadamente, a dispensa de pagamento antecipado dos encargos judiciais e/ou a assistência de um advogado.» (itálico aditado).

Daí o sentido da declaração do Tribunal dada em resposta à questão prejudicial: «O princípio da proteção jurisdicional efetiva, como consagrado no artigo 47.º da Carta, deve ser interpretado no sentido de que não está excluído que possa ser invocado por pessoas coletivas e que o apoio concedido em aplicação deste princípio pode abranger, designadamente, a dispensa de pagamento antecipado dos encargos judiciais e/ou a assistência de um advogado.

Este entendimento do princípio da proteção jurisdicional efetiva consagrado no artigo 47.º da CDFUE afasta, desde logo, a ideia de uma necessária incompatibilidade entre o apoio judiciário prestado a pessoas coletivas com fins lucrativos e o bom funcionamento de mercados concorrenciais, como é o caso do mercado interno.

(…) a impossibilidade absoluta de uma pessoa coletiva com fins lucrativos discutir com as autoridades portuguesas competentes a sua insuficiência económica para efeitos de obtenção do apoio judiciário necessário à sua proteção jurisdicional efetiva – é esse o sentido da rejeição do pedido de proteção jurídica imposta pela norma do artigo 7.º, n.º 3, da LADT –, além de contrariar o artigo 6.º, n.º 1, da CEDH, contraria também o artigo 47.º, terceiro parágrafo, da CDFUE – aspeto relevante sempre que esteja em causa o direito da União.

É neste quadro, e tendo em conta que o direito fundamental à tutela jurisdicional efetiva reveste a mesma natureza no quadro do direito da União Europeia e no quadro constitucional português, que se justifica perspetivar as soluções do legislador nacional em termos sistémicos – de resto, como se invocou tanto no Acórdão n.º 216/2010, como no Acórdão n.º 591/2016. E, numa tal perspetiva, a norma do artigo 7.º, n.º 3, da LADT pode conduzir a soluções claramente contrárias à unidade axiológica no domínio dos direitos fundamentais aplicáveis pelos tribunais portugueses.

Basta pensar na hipótese de uma sociedade comercial, portuguesa ou nacional de um outro Estado-Membro da União Europeia, em dificuldades económicas devido à violação de normas de direito da União Europeia pelo Estado Português e que pretende efetivar a responsabilidade civil deste último: a impossibilidade absoluta de discutir com as autoridades portuguesas competentes a sua insuficiência económica para efeitos de obtenção de proteção jurídica necessária a assegurar proteção jurisdicional efetiva é contrária ao artigo 47.º, terceiro parágrafo, da CDFUE e coloca-a numa situação de desigualdade face às sociedades em situação paralela noutros Estados-Membros igualmente sujeitos àquele normativo. Por outro lado, a solução do artigo 20.º, n.º 1, da Constituição afigura-se consentânea com a ideia de acesso à justiça, tal como entendido no âmbito do direito da União Europeia.

Language: 
Portuguese
Deciding body (original language): 
Tribunal Constitucional
Language: 
Portuguese