Asylum, migration & borders

The rights of third-country nationals entering or staying in the EU are often not respected. This is sometimes because of insufficient implementation of legislation, poor knowledge of fundamental rights, or inadequately trained civil servants, and sometimes simply due to discrimination and xenophobia.

Some 20.5 million non-EU nationals were living in the EU in 2011, which represents about 4 percent of the entire population. To compare with this figure, 250,000 to 300,000 people on average apply for asylum in the EU each year. FRA collects data and information on the implementation of these people’s rights, identifying existing gaps as well as promising practices in the Member States. It then proposes ways of addressing shortfalls on the one hand, and making wider use of good practices on the other. Until now, the agency’s work has focused on fundamental rights at borders, the rights of migrants in an irregular situation, and asylum. In 2013, FRA began research on severe forms of labour exploitation, which is often closely connected to the violation of migrants’ and asylum seekers’ rights.

The EU has a set of rules and policies that cover visa, borders and asylum, counteract irregular migration and, to a lesser extent, concern the admission and integration of migrants. In addition, most rights enshrined in the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights apply to everyone, regardless of their migration status. The Charter contains the right to asylum, and prohibits collective expulsion and the removal of individuals if there is a risk to their life or of other serious harm.

Latest news View all

05/12/2019

Protecting migrant workers from exploitation

Some 60 experts from EU institutions and civil society gathered at the European Parliament on 2 December to discuss compensation for exploitation and violence against migrant workers.
Young migrants: Is Europe creating a lost generation?
19/11/2019

Young migrants: Is Europe creating a lost generation?

Delays and serious challenges integrating young refugees who have fled war and persecution risk creating a lost generation, finds a new Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) report. While it identifies some good practices, it urges Member States to learn from each other to give these young people an adequate chance in life.

Latest projects View all

Status: 
Findings available

Practical guide to enhance transnational cooperation: EU child victims of trafficking or in need of protection

The new guidance will provide EU Member States with practical suggestions on how to respond step-by-step from the moment of identification of the child until a lasting solution in their best interests is found. It will also provide a brief overview of the relevant international and EU legal framework, especially in the area of criminal justice, victims’ rights and cross-border cooperation among EU Member States.
Status: 
Findings available

Responding to a fundamental rights emergency - the long-term impact of responses to the 2015 asylum/migration crisis

The project explores what happened to those people who sought asylum in the EU as part of the large-scale arrivals in 2015-2016. It focuses on young people aged 16-24 who have received or are likely to receive international protection in Austria, France, Germany, Greece, Italy and Sweden. The project looks at policies related to residence permits, family reunification, education, housing and social assistance.
Status: 
Findings available

FRA guide on preventing unlawful profiling

The Agency will update and expand the scope of its 2010 guide on Discriminatory Ethnic Profiling. The new Guide will provide a general update of the analysis, taking into account legal and technological developments, and expanding the scope to include border management.

Latest publications View all

Integration of young refugees in the EU: good practices and challenges
November
2019

Integration of young refugees in the EU: good practices and challenges

Report
Over 2.5 million people applied for international protection in the 28 EU Member States in 2015 and 2016. Many of those who were granted some form of protection are young people, who are likely to stay and settle in the EU. The EU Agency for Fundamental Rights interviewed some of them, as well as professionals working with them in 15 locations across six EU Member States: Austria, France, Germany, Greece, Italy and Sweden. This report presents the result of FRA’s fieldwork research, focusing on young people between the ages of 16 and 24.