Information society, privacy and data protection

Safeguarding fundamental rights in today’s information society is a key issue for the EU and increasingly for FRA as more and more people use information and communications technologies (ICT) in their daily lives at work and at home.

However, this growing use of ICT is creating fundamental rights challenges. These range from concerns about privacy and the potential misuse of personal data online to the threats posed by cybercrime or large-scale surveillance operations. As a result, every EU citizen may, at some point, face violations of their fundamental rights, such as their right to privacy, freedom of expression or freedom of association.

In line with the positions taken by international organisations such as the United Nations and the Council of Europe, FRA supports the view that, despite the specific challenges posed by the increasing use of digital technologies, it is essential to ensure that fundamental rights are promoted and protected online in the same way and to the same extent as in the offline world. Recognising this, the Cybersecurity Strategy of the EU has underlined the impact of ICTs – and in particular the Internet – as follows: “Our daily life, fundamental rights, social interactions and economies depend on information and communication technology working seamlessly. (…) Fundamental rights, democracy and the rule of law need to be protected in cyberspace”. In the Code of EU Online Rights, the European Commission has underlined that “the fundamental rights and freedoms of natural persons as guaranteed by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, and the general principles of EU Law shall be respected in this context.”

In this regard, one of FRA’s objectives is to help the EU and its Member States to find the right balance between the challenges linked to security and respect of fundamental rights. Through its socio-legal approach to data collection, the agency combines its legal analysis with findings from social research fieldwork related to information society, data protection and fundamental rights issues. The results of our research serve to inform both policy makers and practitioners at national and EU level working in this field.

EU legislative and policy context

Data protection is a fundamental right enshrined in Article 8 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, which is distinct from respect for private and family life contained in Article 7 of the Charter. This feature sets the EU Charter apart from other major human rights documents which, for the most part, treat the protection of personal data as an extension of the right to privacy.

Historically, the EU has played a crucial role in driving the development and introduction of national data protection law in a number of legal systems where such legislation was not previously in place. A 1995 EU directive on the protection of individuals regarding the processing of personal data and the free movement of such data was a vital instrument in this respect. In May 2016, the EU’s revised data protection rules entered into force, and will apply at the national level from May 2018. 

An updated overview of the implementation of the Charter related to the right to the protection of personal data is available via the FRA’s Charterpedia web page.

Latest news View all

How to avoid unlawful profiling – a guide
05/12/2018

How to avoid unlawful profiling – a guide

In policing and border management, officials increasingly use profiling to support their work. But is it always lawful? The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights’ updated guide helps answer this question with tips on how to avoid unlawful profiling.

Latest projects View all

Status: 
Findings available

Update of handbook on European data protection law

FRA will update its handbook, in partnership with the European Data Protection Supervisor and the Council of Europe, which presents and explains European data protection law in a straightforward way for those working in this area.

Latest publications View all

Preventing unlawful profiling today and in the future: a guide
December
2018

Preventing unlawful profiling today and in the future: a guide

Report
This guide explains what profiling is, the legal frameworks that regulate it, and why conducting profiling lawfully is both necessary to comply with fundamental rights and crucial for effective policing and border management. The guide also provides practical guidance on how to avoid unlawful profiling in police and border management operations.
In Brief - Big data, algorithms and discrimination
September
2018

In Brief - Big data, algorithms and discrimination

Paper
With enormous volumes of data generated every day, more and more decisions are based on data analysis and algorithms. This can bring welcome benefits, such as consistency and objectivity, but algorithms also entail great risks. A FRA focus paper looks at how the use of automation in decision making can result in, or exacerbate, discrimination.
How the Eurosur Regulation affects fundamental rights
September
2018

How the Eurosur Regulation affects fundamental rights

Paper
In November 2017, the European Commission requested FRA’s support in evaluating the impact on fundamental rights of the European Border Surveillance System (Eurosur) Regulation. Further to this request, FRA reviewed the work of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) and analysed cooperation agreements concluded by EU Member States with third countries which are relevant for the exchange of information for the purposes of Eurosur. This report presents the main findings of such review.