Equality

Zločin iz mržnje

Highlights

  • Report / Paper / Summary
    12
    December
    2018
    This paper discusses the evolution of European Court of Human Rights case law relating
    to hate crime, providing an update on the most recent rulings. Approaching hate crime
    from a fundamental rights perspective, it shows how Member State authorities’ duty to
    effectively investigate the bias motivation of crimes flows from key human rights
    instruments, such as the European Convention on Human Rights.
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    7
    July
    2021
    This report examines why victims do not report bias-motivated incidents and the barriers that they face when reporting incidents through national crime reporting systems. By mapping existing practices that have a bearing on the victim’s experiences when reporting bias-motivated violence and harassment, it aims to provide evidence to support national efforts to encourage and facilitate reporting – and ultimately assist Member States in delivering on their duties with regard to combating hate crime.
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    21
    June
    2018
    Across the European Union, people face hatred because of their skin colour, ethnicity, religion, gender or sexuality. In response, the EU and its Member States have introduced laws against hate crime and support services for victims. But these will only fulfil their potential if victims report hate-motivated harassment and violence to the police, and if police officers record such incidents as hate crimes. This report provides rich and detailed information on hate crime recording and data collection systems across the EU, including any systemic cooperation with civil society.
  • Page
    The EU's Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) and the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) work together to help states improve their ability to record and collect hate crime data through national workshops.
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    28
    April
    2016
    Hate crime is the most severe expression of discrimination, and a core fundamental rights abuse. Various initiatives target such crime, but most hate crime across the EU remains unreported and unprosecuted, leaving victims without redress. To counter this trend, it is essential for Member States to improve access to justice for victims. Drawing on interviews with representatives from criminal courts, public prosecutors’ offices, the police, and NGOs involved in supporting hate crime victims, this report sheds light on the diverse hurdles that impede victims’ access to justice and the proper recording of hate crime.
Products
7
July
2021
This report examines why victims do not report bias-motivated incidents and the barriers that they face when reporting incidents through national crime reporting systems. By mapping existing practices that have a bearing on the victim’s experiences when reporting bias-motivated violence and harassment, it aims to provide evidence to support national efforts to encourage and facilitate reporting – and ultimately assist Member States in delivering on their duties with regard to combating hate crime.
Drawing on the ‘Encouraging hate crime reporting: the role of law enforcement and other authorities' report, in this infographic FRA outlines why reporting is so important and what must change to encourage hate crime reporting.
10
September
2020
Antisemitism can be expressed in the form of verbal and physical attacks, threats, harassment, discrimination and unequal treatment, property damage and graffiti or other forms of speech or text, including on the internet. Antisemitic incidents and hate crimes violate fundamental rights, especially the right to human dignity, the right to equality of treatment and the freedom of thought, conscience and religion.
8
November
2019
This annual overview provides an update of the most recent figures on antisemitic incidents, covering the period 1 January 2008 – 31 December 2018, across the EU Member States, where data are available. It includes a section that presents evidence from international organisations. In addition, for the first time, it provides an overview of how Member States that have adopted or endorsed the non-legally binding working definition of antisemitism adopted by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) (2016) use or intend to use it.
4
July
2019
Based on FRA’s second large-scale survey on experiences and perceptions of antisemitism, this report focuses
on the perspectives of young Jewish Europeans (aged 16-34) living in twelve EU Member States. It first
describes this particular group and takes a look at defining antisemitism and understanding the place of Israel
in it.
18
June
2019
This technical report presents in detail all the stages
of the survey and the relevant information needed to
assess the quality and reliability of the data, as well
as considerations for interpreting the survey results.
The following chapters of the report cover the procedures
used in the development and administration
of the survey.
6
June
2019
How much progress can we expect in a decade? Various rights-related instruments had been in place for 10 years in 2018, prompting both sobering and encouraging reflection on this question.
In the light of the events in New Zealand, Michael O'Flaherty talks about discrimination and hate crime against Muslims in the EU and makes 4 proposals on how to make Muslims feel more safe.
8
March
2019
U ovom su sažetku predstavljeni glavni rezultati drugog istraživanja FRA-e o iskustvu Židova sa zločinima iz mržnje, diskriminacijom i antisemitizmom u Europskoj uniji, najvećeg istraživanja ikad provedenog u svijetu u kojem su sudjelovali Židovi.
12
December
2018
This paper discusses the evolution of European Court of Human Rights case law relating
to hate crime, providing an update on the most recent rulings. Approaching hate crime
from a fundamental rights perspective, it shows how Member State authorities’ duty to
effectively investigate the bias motivation of crimes flows from key human rights
instruments, such as the European Convention on Human Rights.
Michael O'Flaherty focuses on the situation of the Jewish community living in the EU.
10
December
2018
This report outlines the main findings of FRA’s second survey on Jewish people’s experiences with hate crime, discrimination and antisemitism in the European Union – the biggest survey of Jewish people ever conducted worldwide. Covering 12 EU Member States, the survey reached almost 16,500 individuals who identify as being Jewish. It follows up on the agency’s first survey, conducted in seven countries in 2012.
9
November
2018
Antisemitism can be expressed in the form of verbal and physical attacks, threats,
harassment, discrimination and unequal treatment, property damage and graffiti or other
forms of speech or text, including on the internet. The present report provides an overview of data on antisemitism as recorded by
international organisations and by official and unofficial sources in the 28 European
Union (EU) Member States, based on their own definitions and categorisations.
21
June
2018
Across the European Union, people face hatred because of their skin colour, ethnicity, religion, gender or sexuality. In response, the EU and its Member States have introduced laws against hate crime and support services for victims. But these will only fulfil their potential if victims report hate-motivated harassment and violence to the police, and if police officers record such incidents as hate crimes. This report provides rich and detailed information on hate crime recording and data collection systems across the EU, including any systemic cooperation with civil society.
6
June
2018
The year 2017 brought both progress and setbacks in terms of rights protection. The European Pillar of Social Rights marked an important move towards a more ‘social Europe’. But, as experiences with the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights underscore, agreement on a text is merely a first step. Even in its eighth year as the EU's binding bill of rights, the Charter's potential was not fully exploited, highlighting the need to more actively promote its use.
The EU's Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) and the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) work together to help states improve their ability to record and collect hate crime data through national workshops.
21
March
2018
New language versions: Czech, Dutch and Hungarian
06 July 2020
U skladu s europskim antidiskriminacijskim pravom, kako je utemeljeno direktivama EU‑a
o suzbijanju diskriminacije te člankom 14. i Protokolom br. 12. Europske konvencije o ljudskim
pravima, zabranjuje se diskriminacija u nizu različitih okolnosti i na temelju različitih osnova. U ovom
se priručniku razmatra europsko antidiskriminacijsko pravo koje proizlazi iz tih dvaju izvora kao
komplementarnih sustava, pri čemu se naizmjenično poziva na njih ako se oni podudaraju odnosno
ističu se razlike između tih izvora ako one postoje.
6
December
2017
Seventeen years after adoption of EU laws that forbid discrimination, immigrants, descendants of immigrants, and minority ethnic groups continue to face widespread discrimination across the EU and in all areas of life – most often when seeking employment. For many, discrimination is a recurring experience. This is just one of the findings of FRA’s second European Union Minorities and Discrimination Survey (EU-MIDIS II), which collected information from over 25,500 respondents with different ethnic minority and immigrant backgrounds across all 28 EU Member States.
The EU Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) launches its second EU Minorities and Discrimination Survey (EU-MIDIS II).