Highlights

  • Report / Paper / Summary
    18
    Juni
    2020
    This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
  • Handbook / Guide / Manual
    25
    Mai
    2018
    Die rasante Entwicklung der Informationstechnologie hat den Bedarf nach einem stabilen
    Schutz personenbezogener Daten verschärft, das Recht darauf wird sowohl durch Instrumente
    der Europäischen Union (EU) als auch des Europarates geschützt. Der Schutz dieses wichtigen
    Rechts steht vor neuen und großen Herausforderungen, da technologische Fortschritte die
    Möglichkeiten beispielsweise bei der Überwachung, beim Abfangen von Kommunikation und
    bei der Datenspeicherung erweitern. Dieses Handbuch bietet für Angehörige der Rechtsberufe,
    die sich im Bereich des Datenschutzes nicht so gut auskennen, eine Einführung in diesen
    aufstrebenden Rechtsbereich.
  • Infografik
    Fundamental Rights Report 2019: 2018 was a landmark year for data protection. New EU rules took effect and complaints of breaches increased significantly.
  • Video
    This video blog by FRA Director Michael O'Flaherty is released periodically and will address burning fundamental rights themes.
Produkte
In this vlog, FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty points to the urgent need to tackle disinformation. He provides examples of what can be done to combat disinformation, including what the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights could contribute to this challenge.
10
Juni
2021
Das Jahr 2020 brachte beim Schutz der Grundrechte
sowohl Fortschritte als auch Rückschritte. In ihrem
Grundrechte-Bericht 2021 untersucht die FRA wichtige
Entwicklungen auf diesem Gebiet und zeigt sowohl
Erfolge als auch Bereiche auf, in denen es immer
noch Probleme gibt.
10
Juni
2021
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2021 reviews major developments in the field in 2020, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fundamental rights. The remaining chapters cover: the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights; equality and non-discrimination; racism, xenophobia and related intolerance; Roma equality and inclusion; asylum, borders and migration; information society, privacy and data protection; rights of the child; access to justice; and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
10
Juni
2021
This focus looks at COVID-19’s impact on fundamental
rights. It underscores that a human rights-based
approach to tackling the pandemic requires balanced
measures that are based on law, necessary, temporary
and proportional. It also requires addressing the
pandemic’s socio-economic impact, protecting the
vulnerable and fighting racism.
The COVID-19 pandemic has an impact on everyone. Governments take urgent measures to curb its spread to safeguard public health and provide medical care to those who need it. They are acting to defend the human rights of health and of life itself. Inevitably, these measures limit our human and fundamental rights to an extent rarely experienced in peacetime. It is important to ensure that such limitations are consistent with our legal safeguards and that their impact on particular groups is adequately taken account of.
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in many decisions that affect our daily lives. From deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets to where a burglary is likely to take place. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. Drawing on the ‘Getting the future right – Artificial intelligence and fundamental rights’ report, FRA explores the potential benefits and possible errors that can occur focusing on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
Januar
2021
Der Bericht der FRA über künstliche Intelligenz und Grundrechte präsentiert konkrete Beispiele dafür, wie Unternehmen und Behörden in der EU künstliche Intelligenz einsetzen oder einzusetzen versuchen. Diese Zusammenfassung stellt die wichtigsten Erkenntnisse aus dem Bericht vor, die sowohl auf Unionsebene als auch auf nationaler Ebene für die Politikgestaltung auf dem Gebiet des menschen- und grundrechtskonformen Einsatzes von KI-Tools genutzt werden können.
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in many decisions that affect our daily lives. From deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets to where a burglary is likely to take place. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. Drawing on the ‘Getting the future right – Artificial intelligence and fundamental rights’ report, FRA presents a number of key considerations to help businesses and administrations respect fundamental rights when using AI.
This is a recording from the morning session of the high-level virtual event "Doing Artificial Intelligence the European way" which took place on 14 December 2020.
This is a recording from the afternoon session of the high-level virtual event "Doing Artificial Intelligence the European way" which took place on 14 December 2020.
Artificial intelligence is here. It’s not going away. It can be a force for good, but it needs to be watched so carefully in terms of respect for our human fundamental rights. The EU Fundamental Rights Agency is deeply committed to this work.Our ambition is not just to ensure that AI respects our rights, but also that it protects and promotes them.
Will AI revolutionise the delivery of our public services? And what's the right balance? How is the private sector using AI to automate decisions — and what implications
might that have? Are some form of binding rules necessary to monitor and regulate the use of AI technology - and what should these rules look like?
How do we embrace progress while protecting our fundamental rights? As data-driven decision making increasingly touches our daily lives, what does this mean
for our fundamental rights? A step into the dark? Or the next giant leap? The time to answer these questions is here and now. Let’s seize the opportunities, but understand the challenges. Let’s make AI work for everyone in Europe…And get the future right.
14
Dezember
2020
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets, where a burglary is likely to take place, whether someone is at risk of cancer, or who sees that catchy advertisement for low mortgage rates. Its use keeps growing, presenting seemingly endless possibilities. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. This report presents concrete examples of how companies and public administrations in the EU are using, or trying to use, AI. It focuses on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
Juli
2020
As we enter the second half of 2020, the constraints on our daily lives
brought about by the Coronavirus pandemic have become a firm reality.
New local lockdowns and the reintroduction of restrictive measures
prompted by fresh outbreaks of the virus are a stark reminder that
COVID-19 continues to shape our lives – and our enjoyment of fundamental
rights – in profound ways. There is compelling evidence of how the
pandemic has exacerbated existing challenges in our societies. This FRA
Bulletin outlines some of the measures EU Member States adopted to
safely reopen their societies and economies while continuing to mitigate
the spread of COVID-19. It highlights the impact these measures may have
on civil, political and socioeconomic rights.
22
Juli
2020
This paper presents people’s concerns and experiences relating to security. It covers worry about crime, including terrorism and online fraud; experience of online fraud; experience of cyberharassment; and concern about illegal access to data.
What are the next steps in the digitalisation of justice and of access to justice? This impulse video statement by FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty was recorded for the online conference “Access to Justice in the Digital Age”. The conference takes place on 16 July and is organised by the German Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer Protection during the German Council Presidency.
18
Juni
2020
This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
11
Juni
2020
Das Jahr 2019 brachte beim Schutz der Grundrechte sowohl Fortschritte als auch Rückschritte. In ihrem Grundrechte-Bericht 2020 untersucht die FRA wichtige Entwicklungen auf diesem Gebiet und zeigt sowohl Erfolge auf als auch Bereiche, in denen es immer noch Probleme gibt. Darüber hinaus formuliert die FRA in dieser Veröffentlichung ihre Stellungnahmen zu den wichtigsten Entwicklungen in den abgedeckten Themenbereichen und gibt einen Überblick über die Informationen, die diesen Stellungnahmen zugrunde liegen. So bietet diese Veröffentlichung einen knappen, aber informativen Überblick über die größten Herausforderungen, mit denen die EU und ihre Mitgliedstaaten im Bereich der Grundrechte konfrontiert sind.
11
Juni
2020
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2020 reviews major developments in the field in 2019, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores how to unlock the full potential of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
Unsere personenbezogenen Daten werden für die Auswahl der uns angezeigten Werbung genutzt. Sie helfen dem Staat dabei, die Ausbreitung von COVID-19 zu verfolgen. Mit dem Fortschritt der Technologie sollte aber auch ein Fortschritt bei den Datenschutzgarantien einhergehen. Zum diesjährigen Europäischen Datenschutztag wirft die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) ein Schlaglicht auf die datenschutzrechtlichen Herausforderungen, die mit der Gewährleistung der Wahrung unserer Rechte verbunden sind.
Ob es darum geht, die Verbreitung von COVID-19 nachzuvollziehen oder zu entscheiden, wer Sozialleistungen erhält – künstliche Intelligenz (KI) greift in das Leben von Millionen von Europäerinnen und Europäern ein. Automatisierung kann zu einer besseren Entscheidungsfindung beitragen. KI kann aber auch zu Fehlern und Diskriminierung führen, gegen die man schwer vorgehen kann. Ein neuer Bericht der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) zeigt: Selbst bei Organisationen, die KI bereits nutzen, besteht Verunsicherung, welchen Einfluss KI auf die Rechte der Menschen hat. Die FRA fordert von politischen Entscheidungsträgern auf, mehr Leitlinien dazu bereitzustellen, wie die bestehenden Vorschriften auf KI anzuwenden sind, und dafür zu sorgen, dass künftige Rechtsvorschriften im Bereich der KI die Grundrechte schützen.
Das Leben mit dem Coronavirus schränkt unseren Alltag nach wie vor ein, wie aus einem neuen Bericht der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) hervorgeht. Regierungen müssen in Zukunft sicherstellen, dass die aktuellen Herausforderungen im Bereich der Grundrechte sich nicht verschärfen und schutzbedürftige Mitglieder der Gesellschaft nicht unverhältnismäßig stark darunter zu leiden haben.
Die meisten Menschen in Europa sind besorgt darüber, dass ihre Daten und Bankinformationen von Kriminellen und Betrügern missbraucht werden könnten. Zwei von fünf Bürgern in Europa wurden persönlich belästigt und jeder fünfte ist sehr darüber besorgt, Opfer eines Terroranschlags zu werden. Diese Erkenntnisse ergeben sich aus der Grundrechteerhebung, die 2019 von der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) in der Europäischen Union, Nordmazedonien und dem Vereinigten Königreich durchgeführt wurde. Die Ergebnisse fließen in die Strategie der Europäischen Kommission für die Sicherheitsunion ein.
Während die Regierungen über den Einsatz von Technologien diskutieren, mit denen die Verbreitung von COVID-19 gestoppt werden kann, sind viele Europäerinnen und Europäer nicht bereit, ihre personenbezogenen Daten an öffentliche und private Stellen weiterzugeben. Zu diesem Ergebnis kommt eine Umfrage zu Grundrechten, die die EU-Grundrechteagentur FRA vor der Pandemie durchgeführt hat.
Wachsende Intoleranz und Angriffe auf die Grundrechte der Menschen höhlen weiterhin die beachtlichen Fortschritte aus, die im Laufe der Jahre erzielt wurden. Dies stellt die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) in ihrem Grundrechtebericht 2020 fest. Während sich Europa langsam aus der COVID-19-Pandemie zu erheben beginnt, erkennen wir, dass sich bestehende Ungleichheiten und die Gefahren für den gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhalt noch verschärft haben.
Zahlreiche Regierungen suchen nach Technologien, um die Ausbreitung von COVID-19 zu überwachen und zu verfolgen, heißt es in einem neuen Bericht der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA). Regierungen, die zum Schutz der öffentlichen Gesundheit und zur Überwindung der Pandemie Technologien einsetzen, müssen die Grundrechte aller Menschen achten.
Regierungsmaßnahmen zur Bekämpfung von COVID-19 wirken sich tiefgreifend auf die Grundrechte aller Menschen aus, auch auf das Recht auf Leben und Gesundheit. Dies zeigt ein neuer Bericht der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA). Die Reaktionen der Regierungen zur Eindämmung des Virus wirken sich vor allem auf die Rechte bereits schutzbedürftiger oder gefährdeter Menschen, also älterer Menschen, Kinder, Menschen mit Behinderungen, Roma oder Flüchtlinge aus. Die Achtung der Menschenrechte und der Schutz der öffentlichen Gesundheit liegen im Interesse aller – sie müssen Hand in Hand gehen.
Der technologische Wandel schreitet mit unverminderter Geschwindigkeit voran. Und die Fortschritte in diesem Bereich wirken sich immer stärker auf unseren Alltag aus. Der Europäische Datenschutztag am 28. Januar bietet die Chance, an die zunehmende Notwendigkeit eines starken Schutzes personenbezogener Daten zu erinnern, damit die fortschreitende Digitalisierung uns allen Vorteile bringt.
„Die Migration wird nicht aufhören – sie wird uns weiter beschäftigen“, sagt die Präsidentin der Europäischen Kommission, Ursula von der Leyen. Zum Internationalen Tag der Migrantinnen und Migranten am 18. Dezember schließt sich die FRA der Aufforderung der Kommission an, Lösungen zu finden, die sowohl human als auch nachhaltig sind.
Weltweit greifen immer mehr Privatunternehmen und Behörden auf Gesichtserkennungstechnologien zurück. Gegenwärtig erwägen, testen oder planen mehrere EU-Mitgliedstaaten ihren Einsatz auch in der Strafverfolgung. Zwar können diese Technologien bei der Terrorismusbekämpfung und der Aufklärung von Straftaten helfen, jedoch haben sie auch Auswirkungen auf die Grundrechte der Menschen. In einem neuen Papier der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) wird untersucht, welche Auswirkungen der Einsatz von Technologien zur Echtzeit-Gesichtserkennung auf die Grundrechte hat, mit besonderem Schwerpunkt auf den Bereichen Strafverfolgung und Grenzmanagement.
Die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte ist zutiefst betroffen vom Tod Giovanni Buttarellis, dem Europäischen Datenschutzbeauftragten.
Als Anwort auf eine Anfrage des Europäischen Parlaments vom 6. Februar 2019 hat die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte ein Gutachten zu der vorgeschlagenen Verordnung zur Verhinderung der Verbreitung terroristischer Online-Inhalte und ihrer Auswirkungen auf die Grundrechte veröffentlicht.
Im Jahr 2018 wurden viele für die Menschenrechte bedeutende Jahrestage begangen. Es war das Jahr, in dem die Allgemeine Erklärung der Menschenrechte 70 Jahre alt wurde und die Europäische Menschenrechtskonvention ihren 65. Geburtstag feierte.
In der Polizeiarbeit und im Grenzmanagement greifen Beamte verstärkt auf Profiling als Hilfsmittel zurück. Ist dies aber immer rechtlich zulässig? Das aktualisierte Handbuch der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte beantwortet diese Frage und gibt Ratschläge dazu, wie man unrechtmäßiges Profiling vermeidet.
Die Pläne der EU, die nationalen Ausweisdokumente zu überarbeiten und diesen Fingerabdrücke und Gesichtsbilder hinzuzufügen, könnten den Schutz der Privatsphäre und der personenbezogenen Daten von EU-Bürgerinnen und -Bürgern gefährden, stellt das neueste Gutachten der EU-Agentur für Grundrechte fest.
Nach neuen Vorschlägen für das Visa-Informationssystem (VIS) der EU könnten sensible personenbezogene Daten von langfristig Aufenthaltsberechtigten auf unbestimmte Zeit gespeichert werden. Dem jüngsten Gutachten der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) zufolge ist dies mit Risiken für die Privatsphäre und den Datenschutz verbunden.
Beinahe 60 % der Europäerinnen und Europäer finden, dass es bei der Arbeitssuche von Nachteil ist, alt zu sein. Die Gesellschaft sieht ältere Menschen häufig als Belastung an. Zu oft übersehen wir die grundlegenden Menschenrechte unserer älteren Mitmenschen. In ihrem Grundrechtebericht 2018 untersucht die Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA), wie ein rechtebezogener Ansatz hin zu Achtung älteren Menschen gegenüber fußzufassen beginnt.
Das neue Themenpapier der Agentur der Europäischen Union für Grundrechte (FRA) befasst sich mit dem Diskriminierungspotenzial, das die Nutzung großer Datenmengen (Big Data) für die automatisierte Entscheidungsfindung birgt. Zusätzlich zeigt das Papier auch mögliche Wege zur Minimierung dieses Risikos auf.
-
Die FRA hat Menschen aus allen Gesellschaftsschichten zu ihrem integrativen, innovativen und zukunftsorientierten Grundrechteforum vom 20. bis zum 23. Juni 2016 nach Wien eingeladen.