Highlights

  • Handbook / Guide / Manual
    17
    December
    2020
    La convention européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH) et la législation de l’Union européenne
    (UE) fournissent un cadre de plus en plus important pour la protection des droits
    des ressortissants étrangers. La législation de l’UE relative à l’asile, aux frontières et à l’immigration
    se développe rapidement. Il existe un impressionnant corpus de jurisprudence de
    la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme qui porte, en particulier, sur les articles 3, 5, 8 et
    13 de la CEDH. La Cour de justice de l’Union européenne (CJUE) est également de plus en
    plus souvent appelée à se prononcer sur l’interprétation des dispositions de la législation de
    l’UE en la matière. La troisième édition du présent manuel, mise à jour jusqu’en juillet 2020,
    expose de manière accessible cette législation et la jurisprudence des deux cours européennes
    dans ce domaine.
  • Rapport / Publication / Résumé
    27
    March
    2020
    Les États membres du Conseil de l’Europe (CdE) et de l’Union européenne (UE) jouissent du droit indéniable de contrôler souverainement l’entrée des étrangers sur leur territoire. Dans l’exercice du contrôle de leurs frontières, les États ont le devoir de protéger les droits fondamentaux de toutes les personnes qui se trouvent sous leur juridiction, indépendamment de leur nationalité et/ou de leur situation juridique. Cela englobe la fourniture d’un accès aux procédures d’asile, conformément au droit de l’UE.
  • Page
    ‘Hotspots’ are facilities set up at the EU’s external border in Greece and Italy for the initial reception, identification and registration of asylum seekers and other migrants coming to the EU by sea. They also serve to channel newly-arrived people into international protection, return or other procedures.
  • Periodic updates / Series
    18
    February
    2013
    Based on its findings and research FRA provides practical guidance to support the implementation of fundamental rights in the EU Member States. This series contains practical guidance on: Initial-reception facilities at external borders; Apprehension of migrants in an irregular situation; Guidance on how to reduce the risk of refoulement in external border management when working in or together with third countries; Fundamental rights implications of the obligation to provide fingerprints for Eurodac; Twelve operational fundamental rights considerations for law enforcement when processing Passenger Name Record (PNR) data and Border controls and fundamental rights at external land borders.
Products
February
2020
In today’s media landscape the way in which journalists
and editors receive, process and publish news
is constantly changing. Journalists face immense
time pressure, as news frequently breaks online To facilitate training on the coverage of migration
news, this Trainer’s Manual is a tool to be used together
with the e-Media Toolkit.
18
February
2020
The EU Agency for Fundamental Rights has been regularly collecting data on migration since September 2015. This report focuses on the fundamental rights situation of people arriving in Member States and EU candidate countries particularly affected by large migration movements. It addresses key fundamental rights concerns between 1 October and 31 December 2019.
16
January
2020
Ce dépliant aide les agents et les autorités à informer de manière compréhensible et accessible les demandeurs d’asile et les migrants sur le traitement de leurs empreintes digitales dans Eurodac.
19
November
2019
Over 2.5 million people applied for international protection in the 28 EU Member States in 2015 and 2016. Many of those who were granted some form of protection are young people, who are likely to stay and settle in the EU. The EU Agency for Fundamental Rights interviewed some of them, as well as professionals working with them in 15 locations across six EU Member States: Austria, France, Germany, Greece, Italy and Sweden. This report presents the result of FRA’s fieldwork research, focusing on young people between the
ages of 16 and 24.
Periodic updates / Series
18
February
2013
Based on its findings and research FRA provides practical guidance to support the implementation of fundamental rights in the EU Member States. This series contains practical guidance on: Initial-reception facilities at external borders; Apprehension of migrants in an irregular situation; Guidance on how to reduce the risk of refoulement in external border management when working in or together with third countries; Fundamental rights implications of the obligation to provide fingerprints for Eurodac; Twelve operational fundamental rights considerations for law enforcement when processing Passenger Name Record (PNR) data and Border controls and fundamental rights at external land borders.
20
November
2019
Les droits de l’enfant sont notre priorité. Les mesures visant à garantir la protection et
la participation des enfants s’appliquent à TOUS les enfants au sein de l’UE.
4
November
2019
The EU Agency for Fundamental Rights has been regularly collecting data on asylum and
migration since September 2015. This report focuses on the fundamental rights situation
of people arriving in Member States and EU candidate countries particularly affected by
migration. It addresses fundamental rights concerns between 1 July and 30 September 2019.
In this edition Michael O'Flaherty reports back from his visit to the asylum seeker facility in Lesbos and calls for the support of all EU Member States to improve in particular the situation of unaccompanied children.
18
September
2019
Individuals who are not entitled to stay in the European Union are typically subject to being returned to their home countries. This includes children who are not accompanied by their parents or by another primary caregiver. But returning such children, or finding another durable solution, is a delicate matter, and doing so in full compliance with fundamental rights protections can be difficult. This focus paper therefore aims to help national authorities involved in return-related tasks, including child-protection services, to ensure full rights compliance.
12
September
2019
FRA’s second EU Minorities and Discrimination survey (EU-MIDIS II) collected information from over 25,000 respondents with different ethnic minority and immigrant backgrounds across all 28 EU Member States. The main findings from the survey, published in 2017, pointed to a number of differences in the way women and men with immigrant backgrounds across the European Union (EU) experience how their rights are respected. This report summarises some of the most relevant survey findings in this regard, which show the need for targeted, gender-sensitive measures that promote the integration of – specifically – women who are immigrants or descendants of immigrants.
Periodic updates / Series
29
July
2019
The EU Agency for Fundamental Rights has been regularly collecting data on migration since September 2015. This report focuses on the fundamental rights situation of people arriving in Member States and EU candidate countries particularly affected by migration movements. It addresses fundamental rights concerns between 1 April and 30 June 2019.
In the latest edition of his video blog, FRA Director Michael O'Flaherty focuses on the migration situation in the Mediterranean Sea and makes three proposals.
27
June
2019
The EU Return Directive (2008/115/EC) in Article 8 (6) introduced an important fundamental rights safeguard for third-country nationals ordered to leave the EU because they do not or no longer fulfil the conditions for entry and/or stay. According to the directive, Member States must provide for an effective forced-return monitoring system.
25
June
2019
This report is the EU Fundamental Rights Agency’s fourth on the topic of severe labour exploitation. Based on interviews with 237 exploited workers, it paints a bleak picture of severe exploitation and abuse. The workers include both people who came to the EU, and EU nationals who moved to another EU country. They were active in diverse sectors, and their legal status also varied.
Fundamental Rights Report 2019: Not all children benefit equally from efforts to guarantee child rights.
Some groups face particular difficulties.
Fundamental Rights Report 2019: Although migrant arrivals to the EU continue to drop, it remains a divisive issue politically and
across society. Nearly 4 in 10 Europeans think immigration is more of a problem than a solution.
And nearly a half overestimate the number of irregular migrants in their country.
19
June
2019
In 2018, some 2,299 people are estimated to have died or gone missing at sea while crossing the sea to reach Europe to escape war or persecution or to pursue a better life. This is on average more than six people per day. Before mid-2017, a significant share of migrants in distress at sea have been rescued by civil society vessels deployed with a humanitarian mandate to reduce fatalities and bring rescued migrants to safety. In 2018, however, authorities in some Member States viewed civil society-deployed rescue vessels with hostility. As a reaction, they seized rescue vessels, arrested crew members, and initiated legal procedures against them (more than a dozen altogether). In some cases, rescue vessels were blocked in harbours due to flag issues.
13
June
2019
Le présent guide Enfants privés de protection parentale et devant être protégés dans un État
membre de l’UE autre que le leur vise à renforcer la réponse de l’ensemble des acteurs concernés en
matière de protection des enfants. La protection de ces filles et garçons est capitale et constitue une
obligation pour les États membres de l’UE, qui découle du cadre juridique international et européen.
Ce guide, qui met en oeuvre une action clé de la communication de 2017 visant à renforcer l’action
de l’UE en matière de lutte contre la traite des êtres humains, met particulièrement l’accent sur les
enfants victimes de la traite et sur les enfants vulnérables et tient compte des schémas recensés,
notamment en ce qui concerne les spécificités liées au genre de cette infraction.
Permettre aux systèmes informatiques de l’UE de communiquer et de partager des informations peut aider à relever les défis actuels en matière de migration et de sécurité. Cependant, dans une volonté d’efficacité et d’efficience, il arrive que des données à caractère personnel soient partagées à l’insu des personnes concernées, ou que ces personnes soient considérées comme suspectes en raison d’erreurs dans les données. Le dernier avis de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) examine les propositions actuelles et suggère des moyens pour l’UE de garantir le respect des droits des personnes.
Les systèmes informatiques peuvent aider à rechercher des enfants migrants et à combattre le vol d’identité. Toutefois, ils ne sont pas dénués de risques significatifs en ce qui concerne les droits fondamentaux des personnes, par exemple celui de ne pas être traité de façon équitable dans le cadre de la procédure d’asile. C’est le point de vue qu’expose l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne (FRA) dans son nouveau rapport. Alors que les autorités s'appuient de plus en plus sur ces systèmes, le rapport suggère des pistes pour mieux défendre les droits des personnes touchées.
Selon le dernier rapport de l’agence sur les questions de droits fondamentaux liées à la migration, des migrants sont refoulés aux passages frontaliers dans plusieurs États membres sans avoir la possibilité d’exercer leur droit d’asile. Les refoulements et renvois vers les pays où ils risquent d’être persécutés ne constituent que quelques-unes des épreuves susceptibles d'être endurées par les migrants tentant d’entrer dans l’Union européenne ou de la traverser.
Partout dans le monde, trop de femmes sont encore régulièrement victimes de discrimination, de harcèlement et de violence au quotidien, plus de 20 ans après l’engagement pris par des gouvernements issus du monde entier pour parvenir à une égalité des genres et à l’autonomisation des femmes. À l’occasion de la journée internationale de la femme, l’Agence européenne des droits fondamentaux (FRA) demande à renouveler les efforts contribuant au respect de ces engagements de grande envergure pris à Pékin, en 1995, lors de la conférence mondiale des Nations Unies sur les femmes.
Selon le dernier rapport de l’Agence sur les questions de droits fondamentaux liées à la migration, des politiques de gestion plus strictes des frontières sont toujours en vigueur dans plusieurs États membres. Les refoulements et refus d’admission des demandeurs d’asile comptent parmi les difficultés rencontrées par les migrants lorsqu’ils essaient d’entrer dans l’Union européenne ou de voyager dans celle-ci. Les conditions hivernales difficiles compliquent également la situation des migrants.
Certains sujets de préoccupation pressants liés à la migration persistent, malgré une baisse du nombre de demandeurs d’asile dans certaines régions de l’UE. C’est ce que souligne le dernier rapport de l’Agence sur les questions relatives aux droits fondamentaux en matière de migration. Ce rapport, qui passe en revue la situation au cours des deux dernières années, met en évidence les difficultés liées au franchissement des frontières et à l’obtention du droit d’asile, les conditions d’accueil inadéquates, les lacunes en matière de protection des enfants non accompagnés et les problèmes relatifs au placement de migrants en rétention.
La protection des droits de l’homme n’est pas un obstacle à la lutte contre le terrorisme ; tel était l’un des principaux messages transmis par le Directeur de la FRA à la Commission spéciale sur le terrorisme du Parlement européen. Au contraire, comme il l’a souligné lors d’un échange de vues avec les membres de la commission pendant une réunion qui s’est tenue le 8 janvier à Bruxelles, l’adoption d’une approche respectueuse des droits de l’homme peut favoriser la création d’une société sûre et renforcer la sécurité.
Le Forum des droits fondamentaux, événement phare de l’Agence, sera de retour cette année. À la suite du succès de l’édition 2016, il rassemblera de nouveau un groupe de personnes de tous horizons, mais cette année, il s’intéressera à ce que signifie l’appartenance pour différents groupes. Le Forum recherchera ainsi les meilleurs moyens d’insuffler une culture des droits fondamentaux dans l’ensemble de l’UE, en démontrant que les droits de l'homme doivent être garantis pour tous et respectés par tous.
En 2017, l’Agence a célébré son dixième anniversaire, à un moment où les droits fondamentaux demeurent menacés. Cet événement a permis de faire le point sur les réalisations de la FRA, tout en reconnaissant qu'il reste beaucoup à accomplir pour replacer le respect des droits fondamentaux au cœur des valeurs européennes.
Le dernier rapport mensuel de l’agence sur les questions de droits fondamentaux liées à la migration met en avant des préoccupations persistantes ainsi que des progrès dans un certain nombre d’États membres de l’UE. Publié le 18 décembre, date de la journée internationale des migrants, ce rapport indique que, si le nombre de demandes d’asile a chuté dans certains États membres, il a augmenté dans d’autres, dont les ressources continuent de s’épuiser et où des répercussions se font ressentir dans le secteur des services.
Jour après jour, nous sommes témoins d’efforts visant à détruire le fondement des droits de l’homme sur lequel repose l’Europe. La Journée des droits de l’homme, le 10 décembre, est le moment de réaffirmer notre engagement en faveur des droits de l’homme et de défendre l’égalité, la justice et la dignité humaine pour nous-mêmes et pour les autres.
La haine, l’intolérance et la discrimination, toujours largement répandues dans l’Union européenne, menacent de marginalisation et d’aliénation de nombreuses personnes issues de minorités, qui sont pourtant très attachées à leur pays d’accueil et font confiance à ses institutions. Tels sont les résultats de l’enquête de grande envergure reconduite par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA).
La situation migratoire en Europe reste caractérisée par des préoccupations nouvelles et persistantes concernant les droits fondamentaux dans un certain nombre d’États membres de l’UE, selon le dernier rapport mensuel de la FRA. La surpopulation, la rétention d’immigrés, plus particulièrement celle d’enfants migrants et les retards de traitement des demandes d’asile ne sont que quelques exemples des difficultés mises en évidence.
La traite des êtres humains reste une vive préoccupation dans l’Union européenne. C’est également l’un des défis en matière de protection dans les hotspots migratoires où diverses initiatives ont comme objectif d’aider à faire face à ce phénomène.
Assurer un contrôle adéquat des normes au sein des centres d’accueil vient s’ajouter à la liste des défis des États membres de l’UE pour garantir aux demandeurs d’asile des conditions de vie appropriées. Ceci est l’une des conclusions du dernier résumé de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne (FRA) sur les enjeux des droits fondamentaux liés à la migration dans certains États membres. Celle-ci évalue de quelle manière les États membres veillent à ce qu’une surveillance et des normes adaptées soient assurées dans les centres d’accueil des migrants.
The FRA Director Michael O’FLe directeur de la FRA, Michael O'Flaherty, s’est rendu en Italie du 14 au 18 septembre afin d’évaluer l’évolution de la situation migratoire en Méditerranée centrale et la nécessité d’un soutien accru de la FRA.
Selon la dernière édition du rapport de synthèse mensuel de la FRA sur les préoccupations en matière de droits fondamentaux liées à la migration, la situation en matière de migration continue de mettre à l’épreuve une série d’États membres. Certaines installations d’accueil sont en piteux état, et le manque de ressources est un obstacle aux réponses que peuvent apporter les États membres, ce qui représente un danger pour les enfants migrants tout particulièrement.
En 2016, près d'un demandeur d'asile sur trois, dans l’Union européenne, était un enfant. Beaucoup d'entre eux disparaissent et risquent de tomber entre les mains de trafiquants d'êtres humains. Le 30 juillet, à l'occasion de la Journée mondiale de la dignité des victimes de la traite d'êtres humains des Nations Unies, l'Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne (FRA) lance un appel à renforcer les mesures de protection des enfants pour aider à mettre fin à l'exploitation des enfants.
Les propositions visant à créer un système européen d’autorisation et d’information concernant les voyages (ETIAS) devraient faciliter les déplacements dans l’UE et simplifier les contrôles aux frontières. Cependant, dans son dernier avis, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) identifie les différentes questions que soulève le système au regard des droits fondamentaux. Il s’agit notamment de la collecte de données sensibles à caractère personnel, des personnes habilitées à accéder aux données et de la durée de conservation de celles-ci.
L’interopérabilité des systèmes d’information sur la sécurité et la gestion des frontières peut aider les autorités répressives et frontalières grâce à l’accès rapide et aisé à des informations sur les ressortissants de pays tiers qui entrent dans l’Union. Toutefois, comme l’indique une nouvelle publication de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA), ces échanges d’informations comportent des avantages, mais aussi des risques en matière de droits fondamentaux. Parmi ces risques figurent l’utilisation des données à des fins autres que celles pour lesquelles elles ont été créées, l’accès illicite aux données à caractère personnel, la reproduction de données inexactes sur une personne donnée et l’établissement de liens entre les enfants et les infractions en matière d’immigration commises par leurs parents.