Highlights

  • Handbook / Guide / Manual
    22
    June
    2016
    L’accès à la justice est un élément important de l’État de droit. Il permet aux individus de se protéger
    contre toute atteinte à leurs droits, d’introduire des recours contre les fautes civiles, de demander au
    pouvoir exécutif de rendre des comptes et de se défendre dans les procédures pénales. Ce manuel
    résume les grands principes juridiques européens en matière d’accès à la justice, en s’intéressant
    plus particulièrement au droit civil et au droit pénal.
  • Page
    The Criminal Detention Database 2015-2019 combines in one place information on detention conditions in all 28 EU Member States.
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    25
    June
    2019
    This
    report is the EU Fundamental Rights Agency’s fourth on the topic of severe labour exploitation. Based
    on interviews with 237 exploited workers, it paints a bleak picture of severe exploitation and abuse. The
    workers include both people who came to the EU, and EU nationals who moved to another EU country. They
    were active in diverse sectors, and their legal status also varied.
  • Video
    What are the next steps in the digitalisation of justice and of access to justice? This impulse video statement by FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty was recorded for the online conference “Access to Justice in the Digital Age”. The conference takes place on 16 July and is organised by the German Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer Protection during the German Council Presidency.
Products
18
November
2021
This report examines the EU’s main criminal law instrument in the
field of counter-terrorism, Directive (EU) 2017/541. Specifically, it
considers how the directive engages issues of fundamental rights,
affecting individuals, groups and society as a whole.
10
June
2021
L’année 2020 a été marquée à la fois par des
avancées et des reculs en termes de protection
des droits fondamentaux. Le Rapport sur les
droits fondamentaux 2021 de l’Agence des droits
fondamentaux de l’Union européenne examine les
principales évolutions dans ce domaine, en recensant
les progrès accomplis et les sujets de préoccupation
persistants.
10
June
2021
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2021 reviews major developments in the field in 2020, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fundamental rights. The remaining chapters cover: the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights; equality and non-discrimination; racism, xenophobia and related intolerance; Roma equality and inclusion; asylum, borders and migration; information society, privacy and data protection; rights of the child; access to justice; and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
10
June
2021
Ce «Focus» porte sur l’impact de la COVID 19 sur les
droits fondamentaux. Il souligne qu’une approche
de la lutte contre la pandémie fondée sur les droits
de l’homme nécessite des mesures équilibrées
fondées sur le droit, nécessaires, temporaires et
proportionnées. Elle nécessite également de lutter
contre les conséquences socio-économiques de la
pandémie, de protéger les personnes vulnérables et de
combattre le racisme.
31
March
2021
This report looks at the practical implementation of the presumption
of innocence in criminal proceedings, and related rights, in 9 EU
Member States (Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Germany, Italy,
Lithuania, Poland and Portugal). Article 48 of the EU Charter of
Fundamental Rights guarantees the presumption of innocence – but,
as FRA’s research underscores, it can be undermined in many ways.
2021
Le présent résumé présente les principaux
enseignements tirés du second rapport principal de
la FRA inspiré de son enquête sur les droits
fondamentaux. L’enquête a recueilli des données
auprès de quelque 35 000 personnes sur leurs
expériences, leurs perceptions et leurs opinions au
sujet d’un ensemble de questions relevant, à des
degrés divers, des droits de l’homme.
Crime can touch any of us – as witnesses or as victims. But no matter who you are, we all have rights when it comes to justice. These three short clips show some aspects of working together for justice, rights of victims of crime and rights of witnesses of crime.
We don’t all experience crime in the same way, and we might deal with it differently. But it’s vital – as victims or witnesses – that our rights are guaranteed, because access to justice is our fundamental right. Watch FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty speaking on the Fundamental Rights Survey report on crime, safety and victims’ rights.
Crime can touch any of us – as witnesses or as victims. But no matter who you are, we all have rights when it comes to justice. It is for this reason that the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights asked 35,000 people across Europe about their experiences of crime in its Fundamental Rights Survey, and the results are in.
19
February
2021
This is the second main report from FRA’s Fundamental Rights Survey, which collected data from 35,000 people on a range of issues. This report focuses on respondents’ experiences as victims of selected types of crime, including violence, harassment, and property crime. The report also examines how often these crimes are reported to the police, and presents further details relating to harassment and violence, such as the perpetrators and where the incidents took place.
6
October
2020
Business activity affects not just customers, employees, and
contractors along supply chains, but often entire communities and
the environment. This makes it vital that every business complies
with human rights.
This comparative report looks at the realities victims face when they
seek redress for business-related human rights abuses. It presents
the findings of fieldwork research on the views of professionals
regarding the different ways people can pursue complaints. The
findings highlight that obstacles to achieving justice are often multilayered.
29
July
2020
As we enter the second half of 2020, the constraints on our daily lives
brought about by the Coronavirus pandemic have become a firm reality.
New local lockdowns and the reintroduction of restrictive measures
prompted by fresh outbreaks of the virus are a stark reminder that
COVID-19 continues to shape our lives – and our enjoyment of fundamental
rights – in profound ways. There is compelling evidence of how the
pandemic has exacerbated existing challenges in our societies. This FRA
Bulletin outlines some of the measures EU Member States adopted to
safely reopen their societies and economies while continuing to mitigate
the spread of COVID-19. It highlights the impact these measures may have
on civil, political and socioeconomic rights.
This video was produced for the launch of the Fundamental Rights Survey in June 2020 and gives an overview of the main results.
22
July
2020
This paper presents people’s concerns and experiences relating to security. It covers worry about crime, including terrorism and online fraud; experience of online fraud; experience of cyberharassment; and concern about illegal access to data.
What are the next steps in the digitalisation of justice and of access to justice? This impulse video statement by FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty was recorded for the online conference “Access to Justice in the Digital Age”. The conference takes place on 16 July and is organised by the German Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer Protection during the German Council Presidency.

Forced return monitoring systems – State of play in EU Member States

The EU Return Directive introduced an important fundamental rights safeguard for third-country nationals ordered to leave the EU because they do not or no longer fulfil the conditions for entry and/or stay. According to the Directive, Member States must provide for an effective forced-return monitoring system.
11
June
2020
L’année 2019 a été marquée à la fois par des avancées et des régressions en matière de protection des droits fondamentaux. Le Rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2020 de la FRA examine les principales évolutions dans ce domaine, en recensant les progrès accomplis et les sujets de préoccupation persistants. La présente publication expose les avis de la FRA sur les principales évolutions dans les domaines thématiques couverts ainsi qu’un résumé des éléments factuels qui étayent ces avis. Elle fournit ainsi une vue d’ensemble concise mais instructive des principaux défis en matière de droits fondamentaux auxquels l’Union européenne (UE) et ses États membres doivent faire face.
11
June
2020
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2020 reviews major developments in the field in 2019, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores how to unlock the full potential of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
28
May
2020
The Coronavirus pandemic continues to interrupt everyday life in the EU
in unprecedented ways. But the way it affects our societies is shifting. As
governments gradually lift some of the measures put in place to contain the
spread of COVID-19, new fundamental rights concerns arise: how to ensure that
the rights to life and health are upheld as daily life transitions to a ‘new normal’.
This Bulletin looks at declarations of states of emergency, or equivalent, and
how they came under scrutiny. It considers the impact on fundamental rights in
important areas of daily life, and includes a thematic focus on the processing of
users’ data to help contain COVID-19, particularly by contact-tracing apps. It covers the period 21 March – 30 April 2020.
Les enfants ont besoin d'être entendus et d’être impliqués dans toutes les questions qui les concernent. Cela inclut le système de la justice.
Les actes de terrorisme représentent aujourd’hui une menace de taille pour la vie et la sécurité des personnes et un défi majeur pour les États sur le plan de la sécurité. Dans le même temps, les lois et politiques adoptées pour lutter contre le terrorisme peuvent donner lieu, directement ou indirectement, à de graves limitations des libertés et droits fondamentaux. Tel est le constat d’un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Ce rapport, qui se fonde sur l’analyse d’experts, contient des propositions sur la manière dont la lutte contre le terrorisme peut tirer parti d’une plus grande clarté juridique, d’orientations pratiques et de garanties renforcées.
La présomption d’innocence est un droit fondamental en matière de justice pénale. Pourtant, les préjugés, les biais cognitifs, ainsi que des pratiques telles que la présentation d’accusés menottés, affaiblissent ce droit dans de nombreux pays européens, estime le dernier rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). La FRA invite les pays de l’UE à respecter les droits de tous les accusés, quels que soient leur origine et leurs antécédents.
Chaque année en Europe, des millions de citoyens sont victimes de fraudes à la consommation, sous la forme d’une tromperie sur la marchandise ou d’une fraude à la carte bancaire. Les personnes handicapées en sont plus particulièrement la cible. Telles sont quelques-unes des conclusions de l’enquête récemment réalisée par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) sur les expériences des victimes de la criminalité. À l’occasion de la Journée mondiale des droits des consommateurs, la FRA appelle les États membres de l’UE à redoubler d’efforts pour protéger les consommateurs.
En l’espace d’un an, plus d’un Européen sur quatre a été victime de harcèlement et 22 millions d’Européens ont été agressés physiquement. Cependant, en général, les victimes de ces crimes ne les signalent pas. Elles ont souvent des difficultés à faire valoir leurs droits et peuvent se sentir dans l’impossibilité de s’exprimer. Tels sont les résultats de la toute première enquête menée à l’échelle de l’UE sur l’expérience de la population générale en matière de crimes, réalisée par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'UE (FRA). Ils montrent comment des mesures ciblées peuvent aider les gouvernements à soutenir les victimes et à faciliter le signalement des crimes et l’accès à la justice.
Face à la pandémie de Covid-19, les personnes passent de plus en plus leur temps dans le monde numérique. Mais des dangers les guettent là aussi, comme dans le monde réel. Nombreuses sont les victimes d’escrocs et de haine en ligne. Pour célébrer la Journée européenne de la justice le 25 octobre, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne (FRA) demande instamment à l’UE et à ses États membres de renforcer la protection des victimes en ligne.
Il est difficile de tenir les grandes entreprises responsables de leurs atteintes aux droits humains, et nombreuses sont les victimes qui n’obtiennent jamais justice: tel est le constat dressé dans un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Cette situation s’explique par la complexité des grandes multinationales qui sont présentes dans différents pays et disposent de tout un réseau de filiales et de chaînes d’approvisionnement. Le rapport recense les obstacles d’ordre pratique, procédural et financier dont l’UE et ses États membres devraient venir à bout pour que les victimes de ces violations soient assurées d’avoir accès à des recours effectifs.
La plupart des Européens craignent que leurs données et leurs coordonnées bancaires puissent être utilisées de manière abusive par des criminels et des fraudeurs. Deux Européens sur cinq ont été victimes de harcèlement en personne et un Européen sur cinq est très inquiet quant à l’éventualité de devoir faire face à une attaque terroriste. Ces conclusions proviennent de l’enquête sur les droits fondamentaux réalisée par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) dans l’Union européenne, en Macédoine du Nord et au Royaume-Uni en 2019. Les résultats viennent alimenter la stratégie de la Commission européenne sur l’Union de la sécurité.
La criminalité porte atteinte aux droits fondamentaux des personnes. Par conséquent, les victimes ont le droit de faire appel à la justice pénale. La journée européenne des victimes de la criminalité, qui a lieu le 22 février, permet d’étudier les garanties offertes par les États membres en matière de protection des droits des victimes.
La surpopulation carcérale, les mauvaises conditions sanitaires et le temps limité passé à l’extérieur des cellules sont contraires aux droits des détenus et compromettent leur réinsertion, selon un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Les conclusions et la base de données à l’appui aideront les juges et les avocats à évaluer les lacunes des conditions carcérales lors des décisions concernant des affaires transfrontalières.
En cas de procédure judiciaire, chacun souhaite avoir droit à un procès équitable. Toutefois, dans les faits, il arrive que des obstacles viennent entraver le respect des droits des victimes et des personnes mises en cause. La Journée européenne de la justice représente un temps de réflexion sur les défis à relever pour faire en sorte que l’Europe offre une justice équitable pour tous.
Selon le dernier rapport de la FRA, des informations incomplètes et un accès insuffisant à l’assistance juridique empêchent souvent les défendeurs d’accéder pleinement à la justice lors d’une procédure pénale. Ce rapport explique comment les États membres devraient améliorer les flux d’informations et la représentation juridique pour défendre les droits des accusés.
Selon le rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2019 de la FRA, de nombreuses personnes dans l’UE risquent d’être laissées pour compte, car l’intolérance croissante et les atteintes aux droits fondamentaux des personnes continuent à éroder les progrès considérables accomplis jusqu’ici.
Les États membres doivent redoubler d’efforts pour protéger les victimes de violences, estime l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Ses derniers rapports s’interrogent sur les garanties actuelles qui défendent les droits des personnes en quête de justice. La FRA appelle la police, les services de soutien, les procureurs et les tribunaux à prendre des mesures concrètes.
Chaque année, environ une personne sur sept est victime de la criminalité à travers l’UE. À l’occasion de la Journée européenne des victimes de crimes, le 22 février, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) en appelle aux États membres afin qu’ils renforcent la protection et fassent ainsi en sorte que la sauvegarde des droits des victimes soit plus qu’un simple exercice bureaucratique.
Tout au long de l’année 2019, l’agence continuera d’œuvrer résolument en faveur de la promotion et de la protection des droits de l’homme par tous, au cours d’une année qui marquera les 10 ans de la déclaration des droits édictée par l’Union européenne elle-même, à savoir sa Charte des droits fondamentaux.
Afin d’optimiser l’utilisation de la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l’UE par les législateurs et les décideurs politiques nationaux, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne vient de publier un manuel.
Les inspections sur le lieu de travail font souvent défaut ou sont inefficaces, ce qui permet à des employeurs peu scrupuleux d’exploiter leurs travailleurs, tel est le constat fait par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) dans son dernier rapport. Renforcer les inspections pour lutter contre les abus et donner aux travailleurs les moyens de signaler des pratiques peu scrupuleuses sont des solutions suggérées par la FRA pour contribuer à mettre un terme aux formes graves d’exploitation par le travail.
Les citoyens de l’UE ont le droit de circuler librement d'un pays à l’autre mais, dans la pratique, quand il s’agit d'obtenir un permis de séjour ou des aides sociales, ils se heurtent à des difficultés. C’est ce que constatent les auteurs du dernier rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne.
Le 5 juillet, Michael O’Flaherty, Directeur de la FRA, s’est rendu à La Haye pour participer à des réunions dans des agences de l’UE et des ministères des Pays-Bas.
Près de 60 % des Européens considèrent le fait d’être âgé comme un désavantage lors de la recherche d’emploi. Les personnes âgées sont souvent perçues comme un fardeau par la société. Nous ignorons trop souvent les droits humains fondamentaux de nos aînés. Cette année, dans son rapport 2018, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) examine l’avènement récent d’une approche fondée sur les droits tendant au respect des personnes âgées.