Data

Protection des données, respect de la vie privée et nouvelles technologies

Highlights

  • Report / Paper / Summary
    24
    mai
    2023
    This report provides a partial update on the findings of the 2017 European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) report Surveillance by intelligence services: Fundamental rights safeguards and remedies in the EU. It was prepared at the request of the European Parliament, which asked FRA to update its 2017 findings to support the work of its committee of inquiry to investigate the use of Pegasus and equivalent surveillance spyware (PEGA).
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    8
    décembre
    2022
    Artificial intelligence is everywhere and affects everyone – from deciding what content people see on their social media feeds to determining who will receive state benefits. AI technologies are typically based on algorithms that make predictions to support or even fully automate decision-making.
  • Report / Paper / Summary
    18
    juin
    2020
    This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
  • Handbook / Guide / Manual
    25
    mai
    2018
    L’évolution rapide des technologies de l’information souligne la nécessité d’une protection
    solide des données à caractère personnel, un droit qui est garanti à la fois par les instruments de
    l’Union européenne (UE) et du Conseil de l’Europe (CdE). Les avancées technologiques repoussent
    notamment les frontières de la surveillance, de l’interception des communications et de la
    conservation des données, ce qui met le droit à la protection des données face à des défis
    majeurs. Le présent manuel est conçu de façon à permettre aux praticiens du droit qui ne sont pas
    spécialisés dans la protection des données de se familiariser avec ce nouveau domaine du droit.
    Il présente un aperçu des cadres légaux applicables de l’UE et du CdE. Il explique la jurisprudence
    essentielle et résume les principaux arrêts de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne et de
    la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme. Il propose, en outre, des illustrations pratiques
    basées sur des scénarios hypothétiques des divers problèmes rencontrés dans ce domaine en
    évolution constante.
Produits
10
juin
2021
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2021 reviews major developments in the field in 2020, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fundamental rights. The remaining chapters cover: the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights; equality and non-discrimination; racism, xenophobia and related intolerance; Roma equality and inclusion; asylum, borders and migration; information society, privacy and data protection; rights of the child; access to justice; and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
10
juin
2021
Ce «Focus» porte sur l’impact de la COVID 19 sur les droits fondamentaux. Il souligne qu’une approche de la lutte contre la pandémie fondée sur les droits de l’homme nécessite des mesures équilibrées fondées sur le droit, nécessaires, temporaires et proportionnées. Elle nécessite également de lutter contre les conséquences socio-économiques de la pandémie, de protéger les personnes vulnérables et de combattre le racisme.
The COVID-19 pandemic has an impact on everyone. Governments take urgent measures to curb its spread to safeguard public health and provide medical care to those who need it. They are acting to defend the human rights of health and of life itself. Inevitably, these measures limit our human and fundamental rights to an extent rarely experienced in peacetime. It is important to ensure that such limitations are consistent with our legal safeguards and that their impact on particular groups is adequately taken account of.
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in many decisions that affect our daily lives. From deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets to where a burglary is likely to take place. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. Drawing on the ‘Getting the future right – Artificial intelligence and fundamental rights’ report, FRA explores the potential benefits and possible errors that can occur focusing on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
janvier
2021
Le rapport de la FRA consacré à l’intelligence artificielle et aux droits fondamentaux présente des exemples concrets de la manière dont les entreprises et les administrations publiques de l’UE utilisent ou tentent d’utiliser l’IA.
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in many decisions that affect our daily lives. From deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets to where a burglary is likely to take place. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. Drawing on the ‘Getting the future right – Artificial intelligence and fundamental rights’ report, FRA presents a number of key considerations to help businesses and administrations respect fundamental rights when using AI.
This is a recording from the morning session of the high-level virtual event "Doing Artificial Intelligence the European way" which took place on 14 December 2020.
This is a recording from the afternoon session of the high-level virtual event "Doing Artificial Intelligence the European way" which took place on 14 December 2020.
Artificial intelligence is here. It’s not going away. It can be a force for good, but it needs to be watched so carefully in terms of respect for our human fundamental rights. The EU Fundamental Rights Agency is deeply committed to this work.Our ambition is not just to ensure that AI respects our rights, but also that it protects and promotes them.
Will AI revolutionise the delivery of our public services? And what's the right balance? How is the private sector using AI to automate decisions — and what implications
might that have? Are some form of binding rules necessary to monitor and regulate the use of AI technology - and what should these rules look like?
How do we embrace progress while protecting our fundamental rights? As data-driven decision making increasingly touches our daily lives, what does this mean
for our fundamental rights? A step into the dark? Or the next giant leap? The time to answer these questions is here and now. Let’s seize the opportunities, but understand the challenges. Let’s make AI work for everyone in Europe…And get the future right.
14
décembre
2020
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets, where a burglary is likely to take place, whether someone is at risk of cancer, or who sees that catchy advertisement for low mortgage rates. Its use keeps growing, presenting seemingly endless possibilities. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. This report presents concrete examples of how companies and public administrations in the EU are using, or trying to use, AI. It focuses on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
juillet
2020
As we enter the second half of 2020, the constraints on our daily lives brought about by the Coronavirus pandemic have become a firm reality. New local lockdowns and the reintroduction of restrictive measures prompted by fresh outbreaks of the virus are a stark reminder that COVID-19 continues to shape our lives – and our enjoyment of fundamental rights – in profound ways. There is compelling evidence of how the pandemic has exacerbated existing challenges in our societies. This FRA Bulletin outlines some of the measures EU Member States adopted to safely reopen their societies and economies while continuing to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. It highlights the impact these measures may have on civil, political and socioeconomic rights.
22
juillet
2020
This paper presents people’s concerns and experiences relating to security. It covers worry about crime, including terrorism and online fraud; experience of online fraud; experience of cyberharassment; and concern about illegal access to data.
What are the next steps in the digitalisation of justice and of access to justice? This impulse video statement by FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty was recorded for the online conference “Access to Justice in the Digital Age”. The conference takes place on 16 July and is organised by the German Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer Protection during the German Council Presidency.
18
juin
2020
This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
11
juin
2020
L’année 2019 a été marquée à la fois par des avancées et des régressions en matière de protection des droits fondamentaux. Le Rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2020 de la FRA examine les principales évolutions dans ce domaine, en recensant les progrès accomplis et les sujets de préoccupation persistants. La présente publication expose les avis de la FRA sur les principales évolutions dans les domaines thématiques couverts ainsi qu’un résumé des éléments factuels qui étayent ces avis. Elle fournit ainsi une vue d’ensemble concise mais instructive des principaux défis en matière de droits fondamentaux auxquels l’Union européenne (UE) et ses États membres doivent faire face.
11
juin
2020
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2020 reviews major developments in the field in 2019, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores how to unlock the full potential of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
28
mai
2020
The Coronavirus pandemic continues to interrupt everyday life in the EU in unprecedented ways. But the way it affects our societies is shifting. As governments gradually lift some of the measures put in place to contain the spread of COVID-19, new fundamental rights concerns arise: how to ensure that the rights to life and health are upheld as daily life transitions to a ‘new normal’. This Bulletin looks at declarations of states of emergency, or equivalent, and how they came under scrutiny. It considers the impact on fundamental rights in important areas of daily life, and includes a thematic focus on the processing of users’ data to help contain COVID-19, particularly by contact-tracing apps. It covers the period 21 March – 30 April 2020.
In this vlog Michael O'Flaherty outlines fundamental rights considerations when developing technological responses to public health, as he introduces the focus of FRA's next COVID-19 bulletin.
C’est avec une profonde tristesse que l’Agence européenne des droits fondamentaux a appris le décès de Giovanni Buttarelli, le contrôleur européen de la protection des données.
Selon le rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2019 de la FRA, de nombreuses personnes dans l’UE risquent d’être laissées pour compte, car l’intolérance croissante et les atteintes aux droits fondamentaux des personnes continuent à éroder les progrès considérables accomplis jusqu’ici.
Près de 60 % des Européens considèrent le fait d’être âgé comme un désavantage lors de la recherche d’emploi. Les personnes âgées sont souvent perçues comme un fardeau par la société. Nous ignorons trop souvent les droits humains fondamentaux de nos aînés. Cette année, dans son rapport 2018, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) examine l’avènement récent d’une approche fondée sur les droits tendant au respect des personnes âgées.
Les systèmes informatiques peuvent aider à rechercher des enfants migrants et à combattre le vol d’identité. Toutefois, ils ne sont pas dénués de risques significatifs en ce qui concerne les droits fondamentaux des personnes, par exemple celui de ne pas être traité de façon équitable dans le cadre de la procédure d’asile. C’est le point de vue qu’expose l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne (FRA) dans son nouveau rapport. Alors que les autorités s'appuient de plus en plus sur ces systèmes, le rapport suggère des pistes pour mieux défendre les droits des personnes touchées.
Les réformes des lois relatives à la surveillance améliorent la transparence, mais un meilleur équilibre des pouvoirs est nécessaire pour balancer les pouvoirs des services de renseignement, selon un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Ce dernier souligne l’importance de disposer de cadres juridiques clairs, de garanties solides et d’un contrôle efficace pour renforcer la sécurité et pour respecter les droits fondamentaux.
Au cours de la dernière décennie, de nouvelles lois et politiques en matière de droits fondamentaux ont été adoptées, et des institutions spécialisées créées. Mais des défis en matière de droits fondamentaux persistent et ces droits font l’objet de critiques, illustrant l’absence d’une culture des droits fondamentaux parmi les institutions et les sociétés. Tel est le constat dressé par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) dans son Rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2017.
À l'occasion du Forum des droits fondamentaux, à Vienne, des suggestions pour surmonter l’urgente crise des droits de l'homme que connait l’Europe ont été formulées. Plus de 700 experts de renom venus du monde entier ont apporté leur contribution à l'événement de l'Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne. Plus de 100 idées pratiques qui se sont dégagées du Forum sont reprises dans la Déclaration de la présidence du Forum.
Plus d’un million de personnes ont cherché refuge dans l’Union européenne en 2015, soit cinq fois plus que l’année précédente. Dans son Rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2016, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) examine l’ampleur et la nature du défi et propose des mesures visant à garantir le respect des droits fondamentaux dans l’UE.
L’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) a publié un rapport qui examine les dispositions légales qui régissent les services de renseignement et leurs pratiques en matière de surveillance dans les États membres de l’UE. Il souligne le défi qui consiste à protéger les citoyens tout en garantissant les droits fondamentaux, qui sont à la base des sociétés européennes.
Le nombre des migrants ayant péri en tentant de traverser la mer Méditerranée pour rejoindre l’Europe a atteint des records en 2014. Les États membres de l’Union européenne devraient donc envisager de proposer davantage de possibilités légales d’entrer dans l’Union aux personnes ayant besoin d’une protection internationale, à titre d’alternatives viables à une entrée irrégulière dangereuse.
Tandis que les ministres de l’UE se réunissent pour discuter de l’avenir des politiques de l’UE en matière de libertés, de sécurité et de justice, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) formule, dans son rapport annuel, des suggestions pratiques pour que les personnes vivant dans l’UE bénéficient d’une meilleure protection de leurs droits. La FRA présente également les défis et les réussites enregistrés en 2013 dans le domaine des droits fondamentaux.

Dans l’Union européenne de nos jours, des citoyens sont victimes de violations de données à caractère personnel, en raison de l’utilisation étendue des technologies de l’information et de la communication par les organismes publics et privés. Les activités fondées sur le web, le marketing direct et la vidéosurveillance sont responsables de la plupart des violations dans ce domaine.