Data

Protection des données, respect de la vie privée et nouvelles technologies

Highlights

  • Report / Paper / Summary
    18
    juin
    2020
    This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
  • Handbook / Guide / Manual
    25
    mai
    2018
    L’évolution rapide des technologies de l’information souligne la nécessité d’une protection
    solide des données à caractère personnel, un droit qui est garanti à la fois par les instruments de
    l’Union européenne (UE) et du Conseil de l’Europe (CdE). Les avancées technologiques repoussent
    notamment les frontières de la surveillance, de l’interception des communications et de la
    conservation des données, ce qui met le droit à la protection des données face à des défis
    majeurs. Le présent manuel est conçu de façon à permettre aux praticiens du droit qui ne sont pas
    spécialisés dans la protection des données de se familiariser avec ce nouveau domaine du droit.
    Il présente un aperçu des cadres légaux applicables de l’UE et du CdE. Il explique la jurisprudence
    essentielle et résume les principaux arrêts de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne et de
    la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme. Il propose, en outre, des illustrations pratiques
    basées sur des scénarios hypothétiques des divers problèmes rencontrés dans ce domaine en
    évolution constante.
  • Infographie
    Fundamental Rights Report 2019: 2018 was a landmark year for data protection. New EU rules took effect and complaints of breaches increased significantly.
  • Vidéo
    This video blog by FRA Director Michael O'Flaherty is released periodically and will address burning fundamental rights themes.
Produits
In this vlog, FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty points to the urgent need to tackle disinformation. He provides examples of what can be done to combat disinformation, including what the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights could contribute to this challenge.
10
juin
2021
L’année 2020 a été marquée à la fois par des
avancées et des reculs en termes de protection
des droits fondamentaux. Le Rapport sur les
droits fondamentaux 2021 de l’Agence des droits
fondamentaux de l’Union européenne examine les
principales évolutions dans ce domaine, en recensant
les progrès accomplis et les sujets de préoccupation
persistants.
10
juin
2021
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2021 reviews major developments in the field in 2020, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fundamental rights. The remaining chapters cover: the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights; equality and non-discrimination; racism, xenophobia and related intolerance; Roma equality and inclusion; asylum, borders and migration; information society, privacy and data protection; rights of the child; access to justice; and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
10
juin
2021
Ce «Focus» porte sur l’impact de la COVID 19 sur les
droits fondamentaux. Il souligne qu’une approche
de la lutte contre la pandémie fondée sur les droits
de l’homme nécessite des mesures équilibrées
fondées sur le droit, nécessaires, temporaires et
proportionnées. Elle nécessite également de lutter
contre les conséquences socio-économiques de la
pandémie, de protéger les personnes vulnérables et de
combattre le racisme.
The COVID-19 pandemic has an impact on everyone. Governments take urgent measures to curb its spread to safeguard public health and provide medical care to those who need it. They are acting to defend the human rights of health and of life itself. Inevitably, these measures limit our human and fundamental rights to an extent rarely experienced in peacetime. It is important to ensure that such limitations are consistent with our legal safeguards and that their impact on particular groups is adequately taken account of.
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in many decisions that affect our daily lives. From deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets to where a burglary is likely to take place. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. Drawing on the ‘Getting the future right – Artificial intelligence and fundamental rights’ report, FRA explores the potential benefits and possible errors that can occur focusing on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
janvier
2021
Le rapport de la FRA consacré à l’intelligence artificielle et aux droits fondamentaux présente des exemples concrets de la manière dont les entreprises et les administrations publiques de l’UE utilisent ou tentent d’utiliser l’IA.
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in many decisions that affect our daily lives. From deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets to where a burglary is likely to take place. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. Drawing on the ‘Getting the future right – Artificial intelligence and fundamental rights’ report, FRA presents a number of key considerations to help businesses and administrations respect fundamental rights when using AI.
This is a recording from the morning session of the high-level virtual event "Doing Artificial Intelligence the European way" which took place on 14 December 2020.
This is a recording from the afternoon session of the high-level virtual event "Doing Artificial Intelligence the European way" which took place on 14 December 2020.
Artificial intelligence is here. It’s not going away. It can be a force for good, but it needs to be watched so carefully in terms of respect for our human fundamental rights. The EU Fundamental Rights Agency is deeply committed to this work.Our ambition is not just to ensure that AI respects our rights, but also that it protects and promotes them.
Will AI revolutionise the delivery of our public services? And what's the right balance? How is the private sector using AI to automate decisions — and what implications
might that have? Are some form of binding rules necessary to monitor and regulate the use of AI technology - and what should these rules look like?
How do we embrace progress while protecting our fundamental rights? As data-driven decision making increasingly touches our daily lives, what does this mean
for our fundamental rights? A step into the dark? Or the next giant leap? The time to answer these questions is here and now. Let’s seize the opportunities, but understand the challenges. Let’s make AI work for everyone in Europe…And get the future right.
14
décembre
2020
Artificial intelligence (AI) already plays a role in deciding what unemployment benefits someone gets, where a burglary is likely to take place, whether someone is at risk of cancer, or who sees that catchy advertisement for low mortgage rates. Its use keeps growing, presenting seemingly endless possibilities. But we need to make sure to fully uphold fundamental rights standards when using AI. This report presents concrete examples of how companies and public administrations in the EU are using, or trying to use, AI. It focuses on four core areas – social benefits, predictive policing, health services and targeted advertising.
29
juillet
2020
As we enter the second half of 2020, the constraints on our daily lives
brought about by the Coronavirus pandemic have become a firm reality.
New local lockdowns and the reintroduction of restrictive measures
prompted by fresh outbreaks of the virus are a stark reminder that
COVID-19 continues to shape our lives – and our enjoyment of fundamental
rights – in profound ways. There is compelling evidence of how the
pandemic has exacerbated existing challenges in our societies. This FRA
Bulletin outlines some of the measures EU Member States adopted to
safely reopen their societies and economies while continuing to mitigate
the spread of COVID-19. It highlights the impact these measures may have
on civil, political and socioeconomic rights.
22
juillet
2020
This paper presents people’s concerns and experiences relating to security. It covers worry about crime, including terrorism and online fraud; experience of online fraud; experience of cyberharassment; and concern about illegal access to data.
What are the next steps in the digitalisation of justice and of access to justice? This impulse video statement by FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty was recorded for the online conference “Access to Justice in the Digital Age”. The conference takes place on 16 July and is organised by the German Federal Ministry for Justice and Consumer Protection during the German Council Presidency.
18
juin
2020
This document presents data from the FRA Fundamental Rights Survey. It includes data on opinions and experiences of people in the European Union (EU) linked to data protection and technology.
11
juin
2020
L’année 2019 a été marquée à la fois par des avancées et des régressions en matière de protection des droits fondamentaux. Le Rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2020 de la FRA examine les principales évolutions dans ce domaine, en recensant les progrès accomplis et les sujets de préoccupation persistants. La présente publication expose les avis de la FRA sur les principales évolutions dans les domaines thématiques couverts ainsi qu’un résumé des éléments factuels qui étayent ces avis. Elle fournit ainsi une vue d’ensemble concise mais instructive des principaux défis en matière de droits fondamentaux auxquels l’Union européenne (UE) et ses États membres doivent faire face.
11
juin
2020
FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2020 reviews major developments in the field in 2019, identifying both achievements and areas of concern. It also presents FRA’s opinions on these developments, including a synopsis of the evidence supporting these opinions. This year’s focus chapter explores how to unlock the full potential of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
Le 14 septembre 2021, huit organisations internationales ont uni leurs efforts pour lancer un nouveau portail visant à promouvoir la coopération mondiale en matière d’intelligence artificielle (IA). Ce portail constitue une source unique pour les données, les résultats de la recherche, les cas d’utilisation et les meilleures pratiques en matière de gouvernance de l’IA.
Nos données personnelles définissent la publicité que nous voyons. Elles permettent aussi aux autorités gouvernementales de mieux suivre la propagation de la COVID-19. Mais à mesure que la technologie progresse, les garanties en matière de protection des données devraient faire de même. À l’occasion de la Journée de la protection des données 2021, l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) met en évidence les défis à relever en matière de protection des données pour assurer le respect de nos droits.
Du suivi de la propagation de la COVID-19 à la détermination des bénéficiaires des prestations sociales, l’intelligence artificielle (IA) a une incidence sur la vie de millions d’Européens. L’automatisation peut améliorer la prise de décision. Mais l’IA peut conduire à des erreurs, entraîner une discrimination et être difficile à contester. Un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) révèle une certaine confusion quant à l’incidence de l’IA sur les droits des personnes, et ce même parmi les organisations qui l’utilisent déjà. La FRA invite les décideurs politiques à fournir davantage d’indications sur la manière dont les règles existantes s’appliquent à l’IA et à garantir que toute future loi en matière d’IA protège les droits fondamentaux.
Selon un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux (FRA), vivre avec la COVID-19 continue d’imposer des contraintes dans notre vie quotidienne. Á l’avenir, les gouvernements doivent veiller à ce que les dispositions actuelles attentatoires aux droits fondamentaux ne s’aggravent pas et à ce que les membres vulnérables de la société ne soient pas affectés de manière disproportionnée.
La plupart des Européens craignent que leurs données et leurs coordonnées bancaires puissent être utilisées de manière abusive par des criminels et des fraudeurs. Deux Européens sur cinq ont été victimes de harcèlement en personne et un Européen sur cinq est très inquiet quant à l’éventualité de devoir faire face à une attaque terroriste. Ces conclusions proviennent de l’enquête sur les droits fondamentaux réalisée par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA) dans l’Union européenne, en Macédoine du Nord et au Royaume-Uni en 2019. Les résultats viennent alimenter la stratégie de la Commission européenne sur l’Union de la sécurité.
Alors que les gouvernements discutent de l’utilisation de la technologie pour mettre un terme à la diffusion de la COVID-19, de nombreux Européens ne sont pas disposés à partager leurs données avec des organismes publics et privés. Ces conclusions ont été tirées de l’enquête sur les droits fondamentaux réalisée par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne et menée avant la pandémie.
L’augmentation de l’intolérance et des atteintes aux droits fondamentaux de la population continue d’éroder les progrès considérables accomplis au fil des ans, selon le rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2020 de la FRA. Alors que l’Europe commence à sortir de la pandémie de COVID-19, nous constatons une aggravation des inégalités existantes et des menaces pour la cohésion de la société.
De nombreux gouvernements sont à la recherche de technologies susceptibles de les aider à suivre et tracer la diffusion de la COVID-19, comme le montre un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE (FRA). Les gouvernements qui utilisent la technologie pour protéger la santé publique et surmonter la pandémie se doivent de respecter les droits fondamentaux de chacun.
Les mesures prises par les gouvernements pour lutter contre la pandémie COVID-19 ont des incidences considérables pour les droits fondamentaux de chacun, y compris le droit à la vie et à la santé, comme l’explique un nouveau rapport de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Les mesures prises par les gouvernements pour mettre un terme à la propagation de ce virus affectent particulièrement les droits des personnes déjà vulnérables ou à risque, telles que les personnes âgées, les enfants, les personnes handicapées, les Roms ou les réfugiés. Le respect des droits de l’homme et la protection de la santé publique sont de l’intérêt de tous : ils doivent aller de pair.
Selon Ursula von der Leyen, présidente de la Commission européenne, « Les migrations ne disparaîtront pas — elles perdureront ». À l’occasion de la Journée internationale des migrants, célébrée le 18 décembre, la FRA s’associe à la Commission dans son appel à trouver des solutions qui soient humaines et efficaces.
Les entreprises privées et les pouvoirs publics du monde entier utilisent de plus en plus la technologie de reconnaissance faciale. À l'heure actuelle, plusieurs États membres de l’UE envisagent ou prévoient d’utiliser cette technologie à des fins répressives ou l’utilisent déjà à titre expérimental. Si cette technologie contribue potentiellement à la lutte contre le terrorisme et à la résolution des affaires criminelles, elle a également une incidence sur les droits fondamentaux des personnes. Un nouveau document de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux (FRA) examine les répercussions de la technologie de reconnaissance faciale en temps réel sur les droits fondamentaux, en mettant l’accent sur son utilisation à des fins de répression et de gestion des frontières.
C’est avec une profonde tristesse que l’Agence européenne des droits fondamentaux a appris le décès de Giovanni Buttarelli, le contrôleur européen de la protection des données.
Les organisations de la société civile comprennent dans leur majorité les nouvelles règles de l’UE en matière de protection des données. Toutefois, selon un document d’orientation de la FRA publié un an après l’entrée en vigueur de ces règles, elles estiment que leur mise en œuvre est difficile, même si cette tâche n’a pas beaucoup perturbé leur travail quotidien.
Un nouveau « Focus » de la FRA met en cause la qualité des données à l’origine de la prise de décision automatisée et souligne la nécessité d’accorder une plus grande attention à l’amélioration de la qualité des données dans l’intelligence artificielle.
Selon le rapport sur les droits fondamentaux 2019 de la FRA, de nombreuses personnes dans l’UE risquent d’être laissées pour compte, car l’intolérance croissante et les atteintes aux droits fondamentaux des personnes continuent à éroder les progrès considérables accomplis jusqu’ici.
En réponse à une demande du Parlement européen du 6 février 2019, l'Agence des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne (FRA) a rendu un avis sur une proposition de règlement visant à empêcher la diffusion de contenus terroristes en ligne et des conséquences qui en découlent pour les droits fondamentaux.
En mars dernier, lorsque le scandale Facebook-Cambridge Analytica a éclaté, près de 90 millions d’utilisateurs ont découvert que leurs données à caractère personnel avaient fait l’objet d’une utilisation frauduleuse. Cet événement s’est produit juste deux mois avant l’entrée en vigueur prévue de la réglementation révisée de l’Union européenne en matière de protection des données. Pour célébrer la Journée européenne de la protection des données, le 28 janvier, la FRA invite instamment les utilisateurs à reprendre le contrôle de leurs données à caractère personnel.
L’année 2018 a été marquée par de nombreux anniversaires importants dans le monde des droits humains. En effet, nous avons commémoré les 70 ans de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme, et les 65 ans de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme.
Dans le cadre de la gestion des frontières et des opérations de police, les agents ont de plus en plus souvent recours au profilage pour appuyer leur travail. Mais cette pratique est-elle licite ? Le guide actualisé de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA) permet de répondre à cette question à l’aide de suggestions visant à prévenir le profilage illicite.
Selon le dernier avis de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne, des projets de l’UE visant à restructurer les documents d’identité nationaux en y ajoutant des empreintes digitales et des images faciales pourraient mettre en danger la vie privée et les données à caractère personnel des citoyens de l’UE.
-
Des personnes de tous horizons se réuniront lors du Forum des droits fondamentaux - un évènement inclusif, innovant et prospectif de la FRA, qui se déroulera à Vienne du 20 au 23 juin 2016.